PASSAGES


Howard Kunin
Picture Editor
1931–2007


Howard Kunin
Picture Editor
1931–2007

The industry lost a kind, unassuming and talented peer, friend and mentor when Howard Kunin passed away on January 1, 2007. He was a well-respected, award-winning film editor, having received three coveted Eddie Awards from the American Cinema Editors (ACE).

Kunin graduated cum laude from UCLA with a degree in business and marketing. After serving two years in the US Army, he started in the film business at Columbia Pictures as an apprentice editor, splicing and carrying cans. He then worked his way up to film and tape editor in commercials, television and features.

The commercials included Kellogg’s Tony the Tiger, the Marlboro Man and Mattel Toys. Among the TV series he edited were The Flying Nun, The Streets of San Francisco (for which he received Eddies in 1975 and 1976) Starsky & Hutch, Cannon and Barnaby Jones. Kunin received his third Eddie for the movie-of-the-week The Deliberate Stranger in 1987. He also worked for notable producers, including Aaron Spelling and Quinn Martin.

His feature film credits include Major Dundee, Roller Boogie, Fade to Black and Commando. Also, during his career, he worked as an associate producer on ABC Movie-of-the-Week and as supervising editor on NBC’s Supertrain and the feature Class of ‘84.

Wishing to make the ACE publication more important to the organization and to the industry, he became editor of the new American Cinemeditor from 1986 to 1991. One of Kunin’s proudest accomplishments was the founding of his own entertainment industry trade publication, On Production, which featured articles of production and post-production importance. Readers especially enjoyed his editorials, which always included his own real-life experiences tied into the current industry happenings. Four years later, Kunin sold the magazine to Variety and retired, while still serving as a consultant for Eastman Kodak and Quantel.

Kunin volunteered at the Motion Picture and Television Home in Woodland Hills. Before his death, he had just completed a script and was working on the production of the Home’s Roddy McDowell Rose Garden video. He enjoyed reading, writing, playing chess and vacationing with his entire family.

He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Claire, four sons and three grandchildren. He will be greatly missed by all those whose lives he touched.


Jean Eris Chapman (nee: Sherman)
Librarian
1926–2007

Jean Eris Chapman (nee: Sherman)
Librarian
1926–2007

Jean Eris Chapman (nee: Sherman) died peacefully at her home in Davis, California, on March 20 in the arms of her only child, Sandra Filby, and with her two beloved cats nearby. A breast cancer survivor in 1998, she lost her life to melanoma cancer, diagnosed in July 2006.

Born in Springfield, Massachusetts, Chapman grew up in San Francisco and attended boarding school in West Virginia and high school in Chicago. As an adult, she lived in the San Fernando Valley in Southern California; Sonoma, California; Bellevue, Washington; and Rancho Mirage, California. She moved to Davis in 2002.
“My mother was a strong, charismatic, generous, confident woman who made friends easily and loved to create and have fun,” said Filby. “She boasted that she could out-fish any man and never mar a perfect, faux fingernail––and she did.”

Life wasn’t always easy or fun for Chapman. She struggled as a single parent from 1950 until 1958, working two or three jobs to support herself and her daughter. She became a member of the Motion Picture Editors Guild and worked at Universal Studios as a film librarian. In 1967, she married Tom Chapman and moved to a ranch in Sonoma.

An accomplished classical pianist through high school, Chapman was drawn to music, ballet and theatre throughout her life. She also loved movies and the entertainment of Hollywood glamour. Chapman enjoyed playing and watching tennis, adoring her cocker spaniels and cats, cooking gourmet dinners, listening to Frank Sinatra (in person and on records) and dancing (sometimes on tables). “My mother loved socializing with her friends, living in a beautiful environment and having lovely belongings,” Filby explained.

Chapman was especially happy at the Springs Country Club in Rancho Mirage, where she wrote the tennis news, organized and enjoyed charity events and shared with friends the lifestyle of her dreams. She was an active board of affiliates member of the Barbara Sinatra Children’s Center and a volunteer for Riverside County CASA (court-appointed special advocate). She traveled to every country in the world but two. Her favorite trip was an African safari when she was 65.

Chapman is survived by her daughter, grandchildren Eric and Leslie Cantrell and Scott and Ann Filby, nephew Jim Altree and niece Candy Snodgrass. A private interment was held at the Davis Cemetery.

The family expresses heartfelt thanks to hospice nurse Jan McMahon, caregiver Sova Raisili and family nurse practitioner Roberta Allen, as well as Filby’s friends who supported her while she cared for her mother.

Family members feel that the following quotation, author unknown, reflects the spirit of Jean Eris Chapman:

Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly. Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably. And never regret anything that made you smile. Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we’re here, we should dance.


Phil Scott with his wife, Roz.

Phil Scott
Picture Editor
1912-2007

Phil Scott, accomplished picture editor, died on March 13 of natural causes. He had worked much of his professional life as Head of Editorial at MCA/Revue and later at MCA/Universal, a position he held for 52 years.

Earlier, he edited such films as Tugboat Annie in 1933, and was nominated for an Academy Award for editing The Rains Came in 1939––even though 20th Century-Fox Editorial Department Head Barbara McLean was the credited editor. And speaking of uncredited accomplishments, Scott and Waldon Watson were the originators of the “Sensurround” process used in the film Earthquake in 1974.

Scott was born in Union City, New Jersey, on October 26, 1912. His father, Edgar Scott, was a pioneering editor, or “film surgeon,” for Charlie Chaplin. When Chaplin moved to Los Angeles in 1918, the Scott family followed. Phil began working in the film business with a summer job sweeping floors at Fox at the age of 14, in 1926. He liked it so much he left school and never went back. He was also a founding member of the organization that preceded the Editors Guild, the Society of Motion Picture Film Editors, which he joined in 1937.

Scott retired from the industry in 1984, the same year his son Michael won an Emmy for his work as a re-recordist on the pilot for Airwolf. “Phil had a temper, but tempered it,” said his son Michael. “He loved people, but he couldn’t stand them at the same time.”

“If you worked for Phil, it was boot camp––life under fire––but if you survived, you were ready to do battle,” wrote assistant editor Mario Davis, who came up under Scott. “Sometimes our best teachers are the ones that are the toughest. Phil Scott ran his department as a shop, where learning and mentoring of character was taking place, and he had no time for whiners. Phil had one firm policy: If you don’t like it, there’s the door. And I saw a lot of people go out that door. But the ones that stayed, good or bad, would forever be changed.”

“How do you tell somebody that you really loved him, but that he was a bastard at the same time?” asked his son Michael. “I was in the hospital at Loma Linda with kidney failure. They pronounced me dead twice. I came back a third time. My dad was there with the whole family. The greatest thing that ever happened between my father and me was when he came up in a walker when I was still in my hospital bed and kissed me on the forehead. He had tears in his eyes and he said, ‘I love you, Mike.’ That was the greatest tribute I could give him.”

Scott is survived by his wife, Roz, his daughter Phyllis and her husband Gregory, his son Michael and his partner Tony, and two grandchildren, Matthew and Philip.



Richard E. Reilly
Picture Editor
1927-2007

Richard E. Reilly
Picture Editor
1927-2007

Richard Eddy Reilly, son of Bernard J. and Catherine M. Reilly, was born May 19, 1927 in Springfield, Illinois, and left this earth April 9, 2007 in Simi Valley, California, to join the Lord.

A graduate of St. Benedict’s College in Atchison, Kansas, and Graduate School in Champagne, Illinois, Reilly was a Navy veteran of World War II. He taught school in Oregon, Illinois, before he moved to California in 1952, where he met and married his lifelong soul mate, Rosemary Huntsinger.

Reilly joined the film industry in 1954 and had a career that spanned over 37 years: Four Star Television, 20th Century-Fox, Spelling-Goldberg and Orion TV. He retired as Post-Production Supervisor for Cagney and Lacey in 1989.

After 34 years in Northridge, California, raising their nine children, he and Rosemary relocated to Simi Valley, where he continued his commitment and devotion to his faith by teaching Religious Education at Saint Peter Claver Catholic Church. He became a Eucharistic Minister and continued his dedication until his death. Reilly was an avid health enthusiast who loved to golf, swim and play cards with family and friends.

He is survived by his wife, Rosemary, his brother Bernard J. Reilly and eight living children (Richard, Sheryl, Patrick, Timothy, Catherine, Rosemary, Cynthia and Teresa), as well as their spouses, 11 grandchildren, one great-grandchild and 11 nieces and nephews.

Reilly will be loved and remembered by all as a devoted and loving husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, brother and uncle. He will be deeply missed by all those he knew and loved. Promoting good will, love of God and family were only a part of his unconditional love and nature that he showed to everyone he met. His famous and unforgettable quote to his children and friends was “Be good to each other.”


In Memoriam

James A. Love, Jr.
Picture Editor
(February 5, 1920 – February 6, 2007)
52 years as a member

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NOTICE
In order for Editors Guild members or retirees who have passed away to be listed in Editors Guild Magazine’s “In Memoriam,” the deceased’s family must notify the Guild of the death. Please call Fred Arteaga at 323-876-4770, ext. 243 with information.

Also, if family members or friends would like to write an obituary for their loved ones in the “Passages” section of the magazine, please contact Tomm Carroll at 323-876-4770, ext. 222 for guidelines and due dates.

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