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What Do Our Members Do?



CHARLES SHIN - ASSISTANT EDITOR

May 2022

Where are you currently employed?

20th Television / ABC.

 

Current projects?

I’m currently doing a pilot for standup comedian Jo Koy.

 

Describe your job.

I do the regular duties that all assistant editors are required to do, like organizing dailies on the whole project, designing sound effects, temp visual effects, and turnovers. I did have a chance to cut a couple of scenes and got feedback from my editor, which was very helpful, especially during a pilot that, due to its nature, never afforded the time to cut scenes and get feedback. So that was nice.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I used to edit reality shows. My heart was never into cutting reality, but I was tempted by the dark side —  the money. Because I’m a big cinephile and living in this golden age of great television, I decided to make the big sacrifice: I took a step back and became an assistant editor so I could eventually cut on a scripted show.

 

Who gave you your first break?

I found my first scripted job on Facebook. Hahn Cho was the first post supervisor who took a chance on me. My first scripted gig, “Alive in Denver,” was for a streaming platform that went defunct. But my good friend Saleem Aziz, an editor, really helped my career take off when he got me an interview with what became my first network show, “New Girl.” I had previously interviewed for the show five years earlier, but I got beat out by someone with better connections, so it was a full-circle moment for me when I got the job for the show’s last season.

 

What was your first union job?

My first union job came from a reality stage show called “Superhuman,” which my friend Joe Gonzalez helped me get on. Actually, I had to jump from the non-union show I was cutting to do “Superhuman” because it was a union show, and I hoped it would change my life to start working on union shows. Turns out it was worth burning the bridge at the job I’d left behind.

 

What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?

So far, “Fresh Off the Boat,” “Pen15,” and this Jo Koy Pilot I’m on now. I’m Asian and working on a show with great Asian representation, but I’m the only Asian working in post on a show about Asians, which is cool/funny/nice all at the same time. It’s even more special because “Fresh Off the Boat” and “Pen15” are such game-changing cultural-breakthrough comedies – and they’re big hits. Another project I am also very proud of is “Naomi” because that was the first pilot I worked on, a drama/comic/action show that got picked up. You feel invested in the show because of all the long hours you put into it, and seeing it go out into the world is also special. Plus, I got to work with Gina Hirsch whose dad is Paul Hirsch, an editing legend who won an Oscar for cutting the first “Star Wars” movie. I’m a big “Star Wars” fan, so it was cool to work with someone who was there when it happened and tells great stories about it.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

One of the two biggest challenges was doing the pilot for “Naomi.” There were some things I wasn’t familiar with, like working with a conformed sequence and the workflow of doing a pilot. Luckily, I brought along someone I’d worked with before who had more experience than I did and could show me what I didn’t know. We were a great team because we had each other’s backs down in the trenches. The other challenge was learning what it’s like to work on a big theatrical feature. You get thrown into the fire and try to make sure not to mess anything up.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

That would be on “New Girl” and “Fresh Off the Boat.” Both crews were laid back and knew how to let you do your work, but they also had parties, made sure your birthday is celebrated, Mardi gras celebrations, going-away parties, etc. Also, on both of those shows, if I was done with my work, I was able to go on set and meet the production crew or go to the writers room. They would let me explore anytime I wanted. It was a great experience to get to know the cast and production crew, especially after COVID. Post had been work-from-home and imposed various restrictions, so I felt I made the best use of my time when there was no pandemic.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

Directing! I got into editing to become a better director. I just finished shooting my first short, which was self-funded, and had an issue because I wasn’t going to make my day. I was renting a location and running out of time to shoot two more scenes that were needed. Thanks to my experience in post, I was able to combine two scenes into one, and it made the film work better. I solved the problem by thinking like an editor: how things could cut together, shot selection, what was most important to get and what was okay to miss. But I still love editing and would like to do both.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I have two kids, Leo and Ellie, who are my hobbies, activities, and passion! So I don’t have a lot of free time, but when I do, I’m watching movies in a theater as much as possible. I especially like going to retro theaters like the New Beverly (which is four blocks from where I live) or going to an American Cinematheque screening and watching films I’ve never seen or maybe haven’t seen on the big screen. I’m a cinephile, and I want to be a knowledgeable one, so I see as many films as possible, anything and everything. I’m prepping myself in case I ever get stuck in a room with Quentin Tarantino and Guillermo Del Toro, talking about films. I also love to see a movie without seeing a trailer or knowing anything about it, even whether it’s good or bad — that’s even more exciting!

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

The first “Star Wars” movie, which is now subtitled “Episode IV – A New Hope,” is now my favorite movie because of the great story, its technical innovations, and the backstory and history of getting the film made — like George Lucas not sticking around for opening day because he thought the movie would fail, so instead he went to Hawaii with Spielberg over  opening weekend to talk about Indiana Jones. Also, that he invented not just a world but a whole ever-expanding universe is quite ingenious! That happens maybe only once in a lifetime. It would be a dream fulfilled to work on any “Star Wars” project. I’ve fashioned my whole career to prepare for the chance that one day, if I did get called to work on a “Star Wars” project, I would have solid credits that proved my abilities. Another personal favorite is “Snatch.” It’s just a great movie. I always use lines from that movie in my personal life!

 

Favorite TV program(s)? Why?

“Seinfeld” is one of my favorites. Like with “Snatch,” I often repeat lines from the show. But “Breaking Bad,” “The Sopranos,” “Sons of Anarchy,” “The Mandalorian,” “Fleabag,” “What We Do in the Shadows,” “Game of Thrones,” “Vikings,” “Summer Heights High” [Australia], “and five shows from South Korea: “My Mister,” “Reply 1988,” “Vincenzo,” “It’s Okay Not to Be Okay,” and “Squid Game.” I love these shows because of the stories they tell and the clever ways they tell them. It’s shows like these that help make this the golden age of television we’ve been experiencing for the past decade! There are other shows I love for nostalgia reasons. They inspired me to go into television and movies as the career I want to be in for the rest of my life. That’s hard to do, considering the challenge of being regularly employed in this business.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

Yes, I have a few. Saleem Aziz is not only a good friend – he also gives me a lot of good advice about career decisions and paths to take. And he’s been a bridge for me to get into the ACE diversity program where I have three mentors (Lillian Benson, ACE; Jacques Gravett, ACE; Rosanne Tan, ACE) whom I go to with questions or seeking tough career advice. Despite their busy schedules, they find time to reply — and reply quickly — which is nice because sometimes you need to make a decision by the end of the day.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Be prepared to make sacrifices. Some people might not need to make ones as big as I did because it’s also part luck. For example, I didn’t work for six months because I turned down reality gigs so I’d be available to work on a scripted show, which meant taking a huge pay cut — even with a new baby to feed! Have the self-confidence to believe that when you do get called for a show, you’re ready and won’t mess up the opportunity you’re being given. I even took a two-day course from Moviola on how to be an assistant editor, and I interned there so I could get some free classes.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

I have been lucky to work on shows that treat everyone well. Even with shows that didn’t pay well, I never felt like I was being taken advantage of.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

The greatest thing about the Guild is the more you involve yourself and really learn about your craft, the more people are willing to help you, even with this business being so competitive. There may be certain groups that are hard to break into, but when you try to get to know people and are genuine about yourself and not primarily trying to get a job, then things may open up for you very easily. Say out loud what you want. Will it into existence. If you keep at it, there are people who will help you get there, which is why I love working in post: the whole system has been based on the Mentor and Padawan [an apprentice to a Jedi knight], and eventually the Padawan will become a Mentor and pass down what they learned, and so forth. This is one of the few careers where this is expected to happen because your mentors want to see you succeed.

 

Compiled by David Bruskin. 

 

Interested in being featured in What Our Members Do? Send your name or that of a friend to SCollins@editorsguild.com. 

ASHLEY MCKINNEY - ASSISTANT EDITOR

April 2022

Q Where are you currently employed?
Paramount studios.

 

Q Current projects?
I’m a second assistant editor for a feature at Paramount. Before this project, I worked with editor Josie Azzam on a short film for Netflix. Through the pandemic, also for Netflix, I was an assistant on season two of “Never Have I Ever” and part of the assistant team with Matt Latham on “Operation Varsity Blues: The College Admissions Scandal.”

 

Q Describe your job.
As an assistant editor, I anticipate various needs – technical, creative, and anything in between — to help make sure the editorial staff runs smoothly. This can include temp sound clean up, exports, and turnovers to various other departments. Sometimes there is troubleshooting involved in trying to figure out what the hell that Avid error message means, or even some creative troubleshooting like how we can help the editor sell a visual idea with graphics, temp visual effects, or creative brainstorming.

 

Q How did you first become interested in this line of work?
I’ve always been fascinated with the craft and skill that goes into filmmaking. When I was in about sixth grade, we had to write a report on a career we might be interested in. I chose the film industry, but my teacher wanted me to be more specific, so after poring over a bunch of lists and reading up on all the different credits behind the scenes, I discovered what editing was. I’ve always been obsessed with figuring out puzzles, and that’s how I see editing: they’re giant story puzzles that sometimes fit together super-easily, sometimes not, but they can be played with until you reveal the emotion, even if the continuity is off. Ever since then, I’ve been working to become an editor.

 

Q Who gave you your first break?
From the time I left non-union reality work, I’ve been very fortunate to find my way into union work. Assistant editor Alan Mackulin recommended me for several things. Many other assistant editors have helped along the way and taught me so many things—Chris Visser, Monica Daniel, and Shiran Amir, to name a few. Editor Matt Friedman gave me my first union job on a low budget independent feature called “The Boy Downstairs.” Since then, I’ve networked and got to work with editors Phillip Bartell, Kristina Hamilton-Grobler, Waldemar Centeno, Jonathan Angus, and assistant editors Jessica Sisk and Josie Azzam.

 

Q What was your first union job?
That low-budget independent feature, “The Boy Downstairs.” It’s a sweet New York romantic comedy about a young woman who moves into an apartment that happens to be above her ex.

 

Q What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?
Two for Netflix—the film “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” and the TV series “Never Have I Ever,” both for pretty much the same reasons. They have beautiful stories filled with representations of independent and strong women learning how to live in this world, and underlying themes about how we can cope with grief and mental illness. I lost my grandmother right before starting work on “To All the Boys…”, and it helped me through that time because one of the sub-plots involves the main character learning how to process and deal with the loss of her mother. When I watched season one of “Never Have I Ever,” in which the teenage main character’s father dies, my husband and I were in lockdown and his mother was very sick, ultimately passing away. When I got the call that I would be working on season two, I cried. After dealing with intense dark moments, it was nice to work on such light and fun but also poignant stories.

 

Q  What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?
It’s hard to nail down one challenge that’s bigger than another. Assisting on TV and features can often be like herding cats. If anything, I’ve learned how to manage my time better and anticipate priorities. I’m a trauma survivor and deal with PTSD, so some of my greatest struggles come out of managing triggers. I have a service dog, Xander, that comes to work with me. I utilize white boards and a bullet journal to keep track of tasks and the like. But I think the greatest help has come from opening up and being honest with my co-workers about my PTSD. It’s not for everyone, but the way to correct misconceptions and destigmatize mental illness, PTSD in particular, is by giving it a face and a name. Once I stopped trying to hide it or pretend it was something that could not be named, things became a lot easier.

 

Q What was the most fun you’ve had at work?
Lunch time with the crew of “Shooter,” season three. We had this GIANT table where we would all take a break and talk for an hour. In the office, there was a giant cutout of the show’s star, Ryan Phillippe, that someone would hide around a corner, or do something else to get a jump out of someone.

 

Q Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?
I am not a five-year planner. I tend to take things one year at a time, but I hope to be working on more fun and important stories. Maybe as an editor, or at least starting to cut more.

 

Q What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?
Anyone who knows me knows that I am a MASSIVE St. Louis Blues fan. I try to watch or listen to every game during the season, and I’ve been known to be very vocal when the team makes poor decisions. I am also an avid crafter and baker. For the car paints [during negotiations with the AMPTP, the Guild painted supporters’ car windows with pro-union statements], I made keychains for all the volunteers (if you didn’t get one, please reach out!) as well as gooey butter cake for the office staff.

 

Q Favorite movie(s)? Why?
“Silver Linings Playbook.” The way disassociation and obsession scenes were portrayed really spoke to my experiences with PTSD. It helped me express what was going on inside my head when I couldn’t find the words.

 

Q  Favorite TV program(s)? Why?
Historically, “Gilmore Girls.” I always watched with my mom or grandmother. Seeing flawed but well executed female characters on the screen, big or small, has been rare, unfortunately. As I’ve grown up, I’ve come to relate differently to each of the characters, and the performances are fantastically layered. It’s often like sitting down and getting a nice warm hug. Currently, “Ted Lasso.” As a Midwesterner in a big city, I find it nice to get a dose of wholesome Kansas-boy logic. The show is so well written, acted, and edited. I remember seeing the clip at virtual EditFest 2020 and instantly feeling the need to watch.

 

Q  Do you have an industry mentor?
I have a lot of mentors for different things. I consider them more friends than official mentors. Monica Daniel is someone I’ve gone from looking up to, to having weekly game nights and ongoing conversations about Marvel movies. Richard Sanchez has been a huge resource for questions about assisting, puppies, and sometimes life in general.

 

Q What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?
First, be yourself. You can learn the gig, but if you’re pretending to be someone you’re not, it can be unhealthy for you and for the people around you. Second, be kind to yourself and to others. It costs you nothing but you gain so, so much.

 

Q Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?
In my case, I didn’t need assistance for anything specific. When I was starting out, the low budget features contract I was working under allowed for a field rep to visit the work site, say hi, and see how we were doing. I was fortunate to have the same field rep every time, Karen Greene. She answered my questions and, after the third time or so, brought dog treats. She remembered who I was. That early attention and education helped me to be more comfortable about coming to the Guild with bigger issues and also to become more involved with the Guild. Our community can seem daunting to break into, but this early one-on-one time with a representative made an especially positive lasting impact on me, personally and professionally.

 

Q Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?
You are going to make mistakes, but don’t let the fear of that prevent you from learning something new; now THAT would be a mistake. Not knowing something because you were afraid to make a mistake could ultimately hurt your career more than making the mistake would. Working in editorial can be overwhelming. It’s okay to not know everything. We all start somewhere, and we learn new things with every project. Try to be kind to yourself, and remember: as you learn, things get easier, faster, and more creative.

 

Compiled by David Bruskin.

REID KIMBALL - ASSISTANT EDITOR

March 2022

Where are you currently employed?

I work in Los Angeles onsite at the CBS Beverly location.

 

Current projects?

“Dancing with the Stars” (“DWTS”) season 30 until November 21.

 

Describe your job.

Because it’s a show with a new episode delivered each week, my job can be quite hectic, with lots of moving parts. Each day I receive hard drives and SD cards that have video and sound files of the dancers rehearsing in their studio or doing a special activity, like visiting a theme park. I copy footage off these drives—about 5TB per day—to our Nexis, which serves as the final storage place for the video and audio files because we need to give the original hard drives back to production.

 

Next, I convert the video on 10+ Avids into a format that makes it smoother for editors to work with while editing. While that is happening, I’m also responding to requests from producers and editors for exports of their editorial work, such as a package that gives you some background information about one of the celebrity dancers. They also request imports of videos and photos sourced from the contestants themselves or stock libraries. Sometimes that might be a home workout video from one of the celebrity dancers, or it might be a full length movie from Disney because the contestants will be doing a dance based on Disney characters.

 

After the footage is done processing, I have to group different camera angles together of each couple’s dance rehearsals so that the editors can choose which camera angle to show in their editing. Each night before my shift ends I make sure to finish this so that the editors and producers in the morning have the material to work with.

 

Before I leave, I have to backup projects in case our work gets corrupted and also upload interview videos so they can be transcribed. When we get the transcripts, we use Avid technology called ScriptSync which (to paraphrase the Avid website) phonetically indexes all text and audible dialog automatically and then syncs each source interview clip to its associated line in the transcript text.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

Years ago, when I made a documentary that was my passion project, I fell in love with the editing process. That led to me teaching high school film classes, and my passion grew. The idea of moving to LA to work in post-production full time was exciting. While learning how to break in, I found out about the assistant editor position. Turns out assistant editing is an excellent fit since I love both digital tech and creative arts.

 

Who gave you your first break?

Matt Parcone was the director of post-production at Pilgrim Media Group in North Hollywood. I applied for a job that would become my first Avid assistant editing job. He took a chance since I didn’t have a ton of experience with Avid, so I’m very thankful for his trust in me.

 

What was your first union job?

“Married to Medicine Los Angeles,” season 2, for Bravo TV. Dustyn Gobler was the post supervisor who hired me—may he rest in peace; he is no longer with us—but he was one of the best post supervisors I’ve worked with. Really cared about everyone’s well-being and career growth.

 

What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?

I am the editor for a yet to be released short film called “Consumed,” directed by Vivian Ukeje and written by her sister Winifred Ukeje. It’s a horror film with light supernatural elements, and it pushed me to grow as an editor. I had a ton of fun being creative with picture and sound editing. Collaborating with Vivian was such a rewarding experience because I got to help shape her vision into something others can enjoy.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

I’d say the biggest challenge I’ve had to deal with is working onsite when everyone has to wear masks for COVID safety. That makes communication extremely difficult because I have a severe to profound hearing loss and wear hearing aids in both ears.

 

The team on “DWTS” has been incredibly supportive and patient when I have to ask them to repeat themselves, but it is exhausting having to put in that extra effort to hear people speak through the masks. Fortunately, the editors and producers are remote and I only talk with them through Slack, so that helps a bit. With the other assistants I work with, I just advocate for my needs, ask questions, and paraphrase what I’ve heard to make sure I don’t misunderstand and make mistakes. My disability in a way makes me a better assistant editor because communication is so important to me.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

I’ve mentioned “DWTS,” and they’re a great group of guys I work with. But to talk about another show, “Street Outlaws” with Julia Solá (who’s now in scripted on “New Amsterdam” for NBC) was loads of fun. There were two others we worked with on the night shift. We were all fairly green, so we’d get our tasks and then huddle in a bay together and freak out, saying, “WTF does that mean? How do we do this?” We helped each other, laughed a lot, and got through it in the end A-OK.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

I hope to be working in scripted on a sci-fi show that I can be proud of because it makes people reflect on themselves and do the hard work for personal growth. That’s the whole reason I’m in this biz, to help tell stories that inspire personal growth in others. A perfect example of this: I read a post online from a fan of “The Orville” (one of my favorite shows) who described how one episode inspired him to reflect on his career work-life balance. He changed careers so he could spend more time with family! Powerful stuff.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

Health is a passion of mine, so I go for a run or a hike once a week. I spend time in the kitchen a lot. And I listen to “The Huberman Lab” podcast. I’m a big sports fan, especially ice hockey and football.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

“The Princess Bride”! It’s got it all—comedy, action, romance, so good it’s… inconceivable!

 

“Blood Diamond” because I love how they took a real social cause and wrapped the message in a narrative. It reminded me of Leo Tolstoy’s 1895 short story, “Master and Man.”

 

“Sound of Metal.” The end sequence with Ruben is as close to virtual reality as we’re going to get without it being a 360 VR film. The way the picture and sound editing fuse together to go beyond showing us Ruben’s experience—instead, we become Ruben—was stunning. As soon as it ended, I knew it was winning an Oscar for Best Editing. It’s also the only film that somewhat represents my experiences as someone with severe to profound hearing loss. For the first time in my life, there’s a film I can point to if anyone wants to know what hearing loss is like for me.

 

Favorite TV program(s)? Why?

“Ted Lasso,” “The Orville,” “Battlestar Galactica” (the 2004 TV series by Ron Moore), and “Mr. Robot” come to mind. Without getting into each one, they all have amazing characters and stories that make me reflect on who I am.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

I have a few friends I reach out to and couldn’t have gotten to where I am without their help.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Do it! Don’t delay! With the amount of shows out there looking for help, there’s never been a better time to give assistant editing a shot. Seek out educational materials in text books, take training classes, ask questions, shadow friends, and eventually you’ll get that first job.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

Ha-ha, I think I’m probably emailing or calling [former Field Rep, now Assistant Western Executive Director] Jessica Pratt once a week with questions or problems. She’s always been there for me and helps me every time.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

Know that what you do is extremely valuable. Especially if you’re an assistant editor. I’ll never forget quitting from a company that will go unnamed; the president of post-production said, “I don’t think you understand! If you leave, the show stops!”

 

Bingo!

 

Compiled by David Bruskin. 

ALEX SZABO - ASSISTANT EDITOR

February 2022

Where are you currently employed?

I’m in the early steps of editing a horror-comedy feature. It’s a little project during my hiatus on “Ted Lasso.”

 

Current projects?

I’m an assistant editor on “Ted Lasso.” I assist for editor [and MPEG board member] A.J. Catoline.  The other assistant editor is Francesca Castro who works for editor Melissa McCoy. There is some collaboration between us all!

 

Describe your job.

I’m sure readers of this magazine know the job, but I have a hard time explaining the basic concept of editing to relatives during the holidays. So how are they supposed to wrap their head around the little details of assistant editing? It is both technical and creative thinking on the job. Before production wraps, we’re usually ingesting the previous day’s batch of scenes (dailies) into Avid and organizing the notes from the day. When my editor A.J. is fairly satisfied with roughing out a scene, I’ll take the sequence and apply a lot of sound work to it and sometimes a placeholder piece of score or needle drop. Eventually we climb from editor’s cuts all the way to studio and network cuts, but there are usually many pit stops with rounds of notes and miscellaneous exported clips sent to set as a reference. I help digest notes with A.J. in a sort of analytical process to see how I can help tackle them easily. In a personal general sense, though, I try to keep spirits up when things feel super-busy, point out funny ideas in an edit or performance, and offer up my eyeballs and brain on the best course of a scene we’ve watched countless times. I didn’t even get into roughing out visual effects and working with music supervisors. It’s a lot to explain to a blank-staring relative!

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I’m not sure really. I have fuzzy memories of pausing (ruining) VHS tapes at my parents’ house. I’d be staring at a favorite scene, wondering how it was possible. So if I were to pop in our copy of “Home Alone,” the shot of Marv’s head being blow torched is very chewed up thanks to pausing on it so many times. I later dabbled with home movies in an early version of Final Cut in the late 90s, and editing really grabbed my attention. So then I found a knack for it during film school.

 

Who gave you your first break?

I worked throughout college doing restaurant work or retail, but I had acquired multiple internships in TV for when I wasn’t working. Years later, I had post PA work, cutting promo spots and assisting in reality where multiple connections from college helped me find the work. I felt I was not really hitting a nice groove yet, although I was at least working. That’s when I linked up with an editor, Bob Lambert. He and the producer needed someone to review all the dailies for a blooper reel in the credits. That work was relatively easy for me to do, and I stayed in the loop and let him know that I was interested in helping push the movie across the finish line in any way possible. That moment helped me gain some needed momentum and experience for other work to come.

 

What was your first union job?

First union job was an independent feature, “Accidental Love,” the movie I spoke of above. It was delayed from a long holdout and a complicated reshoot. It was a right-place/right-time scenario for me as other assistants over time moved into other projects, and I was credited as an apprentice.

 

What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?

“Ted Lasso.” It was and still is an unexpected hit for us, and it’s been a joy to work on. I had worked in a bit of comedy before “Lasso,” but I’ve never been part of a project where every department works together so seamlessly where it creates this cohesive flow. I’m happy we’re editing comedy that’s balanced with a healthy dose of drama and sports action. There are days where I audition an idea, whether it’s a sound effect, good take, or needle drop, and I just laugh out loud like an absolute nut, but I always think that’s a good sign, right?

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

I’ve experienced technical missteps and putting out those tricky fires, but the shift from office to WFH [work from home] in spring 2020 was big because of all the uncertainty and anxiety about it. I remember the couple last days in March acutely because I didn’t want to believe COVID would be so terrible. I left some coffee mugs and food behind because I was thinking, “Eh, we’ll be back in a week or two, right?” Luckily, production was done shooting so we weren’t getting slammed with new scenes in the morning, but we had to figure out how we were to essentially evacuate Warner Bros. with all episodes intact. Francesca and I had to think through copying media from our shared Avid NEXIS storage to external drives. Since we were leaving a shared editing experience, we had to really ramp up communication with the editors. This meant sending bins through email constantly, conforming sound work and notes even faster, and figuring out Zoom or Evercast for screening cuts. This is all happening while refreshing news feeds on the COVID spread and doom-scrolling. Luckily, we came out okay, but it was obviously unprecedented, and I’m thankful for a good team with a sense of humor during the dark times.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

It’s probably a “you had to be there” moment, but years ago, we had some green-screen test footage. We had a clip of my producer friend staring blankly at the camera and dipping out of frame. We spliced him into the sunset from one of the “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies. It was a great gag and pick-me-up moment. There’s a ton of other fun moments, but I’ll leave it at that.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

Five years might fly by! I’d be stoked to be in a position like I’m in now, focusing on delivering great assistant work and being blessed to work with awesome comedy editors like A.J.  Hopefully, I’ll keep getting opportunities to cut scenes and prove I have the editor blood within.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

Music. It was tough not seeing live shows for a while. I occasionally play guitar and wish I knew piano. Our keyboard gathers dust. I’ve been glued to Peter Jackson’s “Get Back” Beatles doc series. When I have the ability to get out there, I like to snowboard but just cruise — nothing crazy these days. Gotta protect your bones and brain. I’ve also played tennis more and more, which seems to be a popular thing lately since it has that social distance.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

I don’t think I have just one, and even choosing a few seems tough! I like too many. Should I list just a few? “Magnolia” might be my favorite, by Paul Thomas Anderson. If it’s one of those “Mannly” nights, you need to fire up “Heat.” “Pee-wee’s Big Adventure” is my childhood favorite. “Tropic Thunder” is my favorite comedy of the early 2000s.

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

Lately, I really enjoy “Succession.” The camera moves and editing accentuate the great performances. It can get so dark, but they still find those laughs, which is amazing to me. I LOL’ed constantly on my re-watch of “Eastbound and Down.” Maybe even a LMAO here and there, maybe too much laughing for my neighbors. I love how the characters are so well-defined even though they’re completely zany, and there are some really fun edits. Plus Sudeikis’ character Shane is an awesome complement to McBride’s Kenny Powers. It’s fun to see the different style of comedy from that era ten years ago.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

A.J. Catoline. I’m very thankful he gave me the chance to work with him on “Lasso.” I feel like there are certain editors who don’t want to make time to impart a little knowledge to assistants, much less let them cut here and there, but A.J. enjoys the journey of mentorship. What’s good, too, is that it is not a one-way street in the edit room. He really values my creative input and perspective. So I’m always learning something every week, which is huge. We always seem to be on the same wavelength. He’s a good mentor and friend.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

I think we can agree that the industry is competitive and perhaps intimidating when you’re finding your way, but I feel like there are more and more opportunities, especially in television. You need to believe you can do it. It’s a basic — maybe trite — piece of advice, but I’ve always had to give myself pep talks in thinking about bigger goals while at stepping-stones along the way. If you’re in school, try and squeeze a way into an internship, but I’d be sure it’s in line with your goal and not too far off the radar. Perhaps a post PA position is within your grasp. I encourage making films with friends. I’ve dabbled in directing shorts, which sometimes come together purely out of curiosity for when we get to the edit. Scenes from small projects might end up being something to showcase, or at least get notes on.

 

Passion projects reminded me that I still valued and enjoyed the filmmaking process, even though my day job was something completely different. It was like refueling the ambition battery. Nowadays, it feels harder to get out and meet people, but I think it’s best to fight against that inclination some of us introverts/not-so-extroverts have to stay home, especially if you know you need to refresh and make new connections in real life. I’ve met people where things don’t click, and you sit there awkwardly with a coffee or beer, but that’s not the worst thing, right? That meeting might go the other direction, where it flies by and you made a connection you wouldn’t have made from just a message board. So yeah, I’m going to feel silly saying the overused Gretzky quote, “You miss 100 percent of shots you don’t take,” but you know what? He’s right, damn it, and he’s got four Stanley Cups. Four!

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

It’s thanks to the Guild’s workshops and mixers that I met a few colleagues, including A.J.! So I’ll give a nod and tip of the cap to the Guild for having events!

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

I’m blessed to be with the union, and I’m hoping we grow stronger and learn from this year’s contentious negotiations. Let’s build upon the grassroots activism we witnessed online. Solidarity forever!

ISABEL YANES - ASSISTANT EDITOR

January 2022

Q Where are you currently employed?
Warner Brothers Television.

 

Q Current projects?
Season 2 of “Superman & Lois.”

 

Q Describe your job.
As an assistant editor, I am a systems manager and a creative contributor simultaneously. At the start of a new show, it is my responsibility to establish the project’s organization and workflow. I manage all media, prepare footage for my editor, and design temporary sound and visual effects. Additionally, I note-take during meetings (one of my favorite aspects of the job, believe it or not) and export video references for directors and producers. Once an episode reaches final picture lock, I distribute this finalized version to various departments including sound, music, and online/picture. Given the large amount of visual effects on superhero shows, I am not responsible for tracking visual effects shots as they make their way into existence through one or more vendors. Nor do I deliver files to visual effects vendors on my current show; however, I have done so in the past for lighter projects.

 

Q How did you first become interested in this line of work?
In high school, I joined an afterschool film club that grew into a broadcast and video production department. Through these courses, I learned the basics of filming, editing, and animation. I gravitated towards editing almost immediately, as I enjoyed the creativity that emerged from assembling footage with limited resources. I majored in Entertainment and Media Studies at the University of Georgia where my love for television blossomed as shows like “Game of Thrones” and “The Walking Dead” captivated me.

 

Q Who gave you your first break?
My first job in Los Angeles straight out of college was an assistant editor position for Fine Brothers Entertainment. I was set on avoiding the production assistant route, if possible, and I couldn’t have asked for a better start. During this job, I fell in love with commuting to work by bicycle and worked an unheard of 9-5 schedule that allowed me to attend every networking event that existed.

 

Q What was your first union job?
“For All Mankind,” an alternate history, science fiction series for Apple TV+. Working with Ron Moore and the entire post team was an incredible experience. Though I have worked on great shows since, this is hands down the best project I’ve ever been a part of. Everyone on the team treated each other with the utmost respect, and I embraced a work-life balance that truly worked for me. I still miss greeting the office with a daily “Hey FAM!”

 

Q What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?
Though the pilot was never picked up, working on Glen Mazzara’s “The Dark Tower” was an absolute pleasure! It significantly advanced my creative and technical abilities as I worked with only one editor and a small visual effects team. Every day, my knowledge and skills were tested to the highest degree, and the collaborative environment Glen and my editor Nathan Gunn created was incredibly fulfilling as a creative. By the end of the project, I genuinely felt like I played a notable role in the final product.

 

Q What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?
Learning to work with unsavory personalities and navigate an industry with historic harassment and discrimination has unfortunately been my biggest challenge. While I have worked with countless amazing people, I have also worked with those who yell, patronize, and violate both my contractual and personal boundaries. I’ve discovered that establishing clear boundaries and demanding respect from others in my personal life has helped me do the same in professional environments. Educating myself on my contract by speaking frequently with field reps at the union office, and reading books like “Difficult Personalities: A Practical Guide to Managing the Hurtful Behavior of Others (and Maybe Your Own),” have also been instrumental. Furthermore, I have learned that financial resilience is necessary for me to avoid or ultimately leave shows with toxic work environments.

 

Q What was the most fun you’ve had at work?
While serving as a substitute on “Mystery Science Theater 3000,” I had the opportunity to work with my favorite actress/producer from childhood, Felicia Day. What a joy it was to watch her dailies and interact during ADR sessions!

 

Q Jobwise, what do you hope to be time doing five years from now?
Five years from now, I aim to be a full-time editor for fantasy and science fiction television. I intend to work on shows that allow me to maintain a healthy work-life balance and whose post teams are staffed with genuinely good people. I’m currently editing alongside my editor on “Superman & Lois” with the goal of receiving additional/co-editor credits and preparing for the opportunity to move up when it presents itself.

 

Q What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?
Food is my heart’s true passion! From weekly meal planning to buying food at the Farmer’s Market, cooking, baking, photographing and of course EATING, I am a serious foodie. I even have a dedicated Food Instagram account: @isabel.yanes.foodie.

 

My other hobbies include all things sustainability-focused (climate change, waste reduction, environmental justice, etc.), stereotypical SoCal exercises (yoga, hiking and mountain biking), and addictively reading fantasy novels from the library. I also love to travel and aspire to live in a different country every year, if possible.

 

Q Favorite movie(s)? Why?
To the dismay of many, I’ve never been much of a movie person. Most recently, I watched “Chef,” directed by and starring Jon Favreau, after falling in love with the TV series on Netflix. I do, however, enjoy documentaries and must give a shout out to “The Biggest Little Farm,” which follows a couple’s journey of developing a sustainable farm outside Los Angeles.

 

Q Favorite TV program(s)? Why?
“Game of Thrones” will always have a special place in my heart (despite fumbling at the goal line) because it is the epitome of what I love in fantasy novels—complex and evolving characters, gruesome war and torture, sex, and of course… magic! Also, DRAGONS. It’s no surprise then that “The Witcher” is my current top pick.

 

Animated shows like “Avatar” and “Over the Garden Wall” redefined animation for me. I dedicated 2021 to watching all movies and TV series in the “Star Wars” canon, and “Clone Wars” blew me away. Dave Filoni’s work is nothing short of incredible.

 

My guilty pleasure reality show favorites are “The Bachelor,” “Survivor,” “The Great British Baking Show,” and “Somebody Feed Phil,” because I can never get enough competition, food, and travel in my life.

 

Q Do you have an industry mentor?
Although we no longer work together, Nathan Gunn continues to mentor me, and I cannot express the immense gratitude I have for his willingness to always be available for me. He is a masterful editor, a well-versed diplomat in the cutting room, and a wonderful human being who has stood up for and stood by me through the best and worst of times. It is an honor to have worked for him, and I hope to make him proud as I transition into the editor’s chair.


Brian G. Addie, my current editor on “Superman & Lois,” has taken me under his wing. As I strive to make the jump to editor, he is teaching and mentoring me on both the craft of editing and the mediator role that editors undertake. I am very fortunate to have found a teacher that thinks and works the same way I do, all while providing encouragement and creative criticism that motivates me to keep going.

 

Q What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?
Read Lori Coleman and Diana Friedberg’s book “Make the Cut: A Guide to Becoming a Successful Assistant Editor in Film and TV.” Develop networking skills and put them to use at networking events to start building your own network. Contact assistants and editors that you admire and aspire to be, with the genuine intent of asking for advice, not a job. Learn to budget and save money. It will allow you to say no to the jobs that don’t serve you and help progress your career more quickly as you wait for the right opportunity instead of the first. Practice setting and enforcing boundaries. You will gain respect and self-worth, and empower those around you to do the same. Establish healthy habits and maintain consistency. Doing so early on will make a significant difference in managing projects where consistency is imperative.

 

Q Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?
Before I start a new job, I call Jessica Pratt [the Guild’s senior field rep and now Assistant Executive Director] to go over my contract and make sure I know my rights. Every. Single. Time. I also send her my first paystub and respective timecard to check that I am being paid correctly. You’d be surprised how much vacation and holiday pay you could be missing out on because of an accounting error.

 

I’ve also spoken with her when instances of harassment and contract violations have arisen. I appreciate that what steps are taken is ultimately up to me instead of being forced to file a grievance the moment I share an issue. In my experience, problems in the workplace are more likely to be resolved when a discussion takes place rather than a formal write-up that can take months or more to make it through the system. Regardless of the outcome, it’s important that our field reps are aware of the issues we’re experiencing so they can better prepare us on how to navigate repeat offenses.

 

Q Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?
Solidarity, education, and active involvement are key to making a difference in this industry. I urge everyone who joins the union and the entertainment industry in general to learn what it means to be a part of this community. See a problem? Talk to your coworkers, field reps, and other union members. You are a part of a collective voice, so use it! When we stand up for ourselves and our union kin, we make the industry a better place for everyone. Never forget that we are all human beings with a shared passion for storytelling. We all deserve a safe working environment, actual living wages, and time outside of work to thrive, not just survive.

 

Compiled by David Bruskin. 

KIM HUSTON - VISUAL EFFECTS EDITOR

December 2021

Where are you currently employed?

Los Angeles, CA – Freelance

 

Current projects?

Recently wrapped on “Cowboy Bebop” for Netflix. It’s a 10-episode live-action adaptation of the original Japanese anime. 

 

Describe your job.

Part of the visual effects editor’s job is nearly fully creative. The task: temp out all visual effects as best you can before the first cut is screened. The goal: help sell the story. You don’t want to lose anyone because the visual effects are distracting or incomplete. A top priority is to take out all green screens and replace them with backgrounds. In a space show such as “Cowboy Bebop,” sometimes you can get away with just pulling the green out (“pulling the key”) and leaving it black. Easy! I found that dropping in stars as the background could sometimes be more distracting, though some elements from NASA’s catalogue were quite useful.

 

I love creating a temp effect by using something in a way that was never intended. It feels kind of like Foley for the sound team—high heels walking on tile plus crunching cornflakes equals the sound of a pig walking through leaves. For visual effects, it could be a spray from glass cleaner with the background layer removed, tinting the liquid purple, and shrunk way down. Now it’s a futuristic application to heal a wound. You can get really creative without it being “good” because you’re just trying to convey the idea to sell the story point.

 

Then, the technical side: Breaking up temp shots into elements and handing them off to the visual effects vendors to work on. I also track those shots as they go to, or return from, two or three or 20 vendors.

 

As finished effects finally arrive, I cut them in, see if they work, and adjust if needed based on the effect (with the editor’s consent!). You also talk about creative intent with the team. There are lots of visual effects reviews with everyone in a room or on Evercast. At that point, It becomes a highly collaborative part of the process, and it really makes you feel like part of the team!

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

As a kid, I went from wanting to be a cartoonist—drawing the Sunday comics, like “The Far Side”— to wanting to work in 2D animation, to wanting to do stop-motion animation like “Wallace and Gromit” and “Brothers Quay.” I was already into building miniatures and clay figures, so that paved the way. When I was about 13, there was an epic attempt to adapt “The Phantom Tollbooth” using stop-motion—until our dog walked through and ruined the “set” I built.

 

In high school, I made friends with kids who had similar interests, and we started to collaborate on live-action shorts. My favorite part was post. I learned a lot about doing motion graphics and small visual effects.

 

And then I saw “The Matrix,” and it sealed the deal for me.

 

Who gave you your first break?

There were many people, of course. This career is not the straight-line path it used to be. I meandered from Milwaukee to New York to LA trying different routes to “get in.”

 

My biggest break was via John Axelrad. While still in New York, I cold-emailed him, asking if he was free to meet up for coffee. He was very kind and said he would love to, but he wasn’t in New York anymore—he was back in LA on a project. I think, like, a year later, we reconnected and he said he was just freeing up, and if I was ever in LA, I should call him up for that coffee. I said, “Coincidentally, I’m there next week!” Then I bought a ticket to LA….

 

At our meeting, he spelled out exactly what I should do when I moved to LA, because I was starting the drive in a couple months. He said to join the roster, then get on a union project as a PA or an intern, and get to know the team so you’re ready to join the union if/when they need to hire a little more help.

 

I got back to New York with my fresh new plan, got on the roster, and started driving to LA. On the way there, John emails me and says, “I’m about to start another project and we need an intern. Are you in?” “YUP. Be there in 5 days.”

 

What was your first union job?

While I was an intern on the film John Axelrad was cutting, he put my name out for union work to everyone he knew. It didn’t take long before John’s friend, David Bertman, reached out looking for an apprentice editor on “This is 40.” Within a couple days, I had officially joined the union as an apprentice and started my first union job on a Judd Apatow movie.

 

What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?

“The Big Short.” It was an incredibly exciting movie to work on. Highly creative and collaborative. The movie was saying something and was teaching something but did it in an entertaining way.

 

“Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues.” I had worked in a movie theater in Wisconsin when “Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy” came out, and now I found myself quoting outtakes with the editor of both films, Brent White—the same outtakes I’d quoted while sweeping up popcorn at the theater. It was an honor to work with someone who had such a hand in molding my sense of humor from a young age.

 

“Cowboy Bebop.” The original anime is one of my favorite shows of all time. I have my corgi (mix) because of that show, and he takes his name from an episode (“Shuffle”). Being a part of the live action was a big, BIG life achievement for me. I’m so glad I was able to have a hand in its creation.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

When I was an assistant editor on “Anchorman 2…”, a scene used stock footage from a “Shark Week” episode. It had been downloaded from YouTube, and it turned out that the original for that particular piece of footage was EXTREMELY difficult to find. I watched countless hours of “Shark Week” shows, but I kept seeing pieces of the shot that were just before or just after the moment we used. But the director loved that particular part of that particular take. All the alts we offered from proper, licensable sources… well, they weren’t as good.

 

I ended up tracking down the original show, but the production company was defunct. The one contact I had replied to me with the name of the cinematographer, but he had no contact info. I managed to find his Vimeo account, reached out, and had him send the original tapes directly to us, hopefully without being destroyed or lost along the way.

 

The tape made it to the office, we captured it in high resolution, and the piece made it into the movie.

 

Friends don’t let friends cut in untrackable YouTube videos.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

Getting visual effects dailies for “Cowboy Bebop” and seeing the evolution from concept to the final of all the ships and the astral gates and everything. So COOL.

 

Trying to figure out which way glass would fly by reenacting the multiple-car crash in “John Wick: Chapter 2” using the Matchbox cars I had in my office.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

Working with more awesome, creative, fun people who don’t want their whole life to be work, who value free time.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I enjoy learning Japanese, trying to grow various plants in the backyard, baking pies and breads with apples from the tree in the back. I like drinking whiskey and gins and fancy cocktails, assembling miniatures or models of things. I like cars, but I’m not necessarily a gearhead. I really like driving, so a good ride is important. I have a Tesla Model 3 and a 1976 Datsun 280z. I like hanging out with my dog, Shuffle, and playing board games and video games with my fiancé, Josh.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

“Edge of Tomorrow” – I always say this is the best video game movie without being a video game movie. That feeling of dying over and over and having to start the level at the beginning… Brutal. It’s basically high-stakes Mario Brothers.

 

“High Fidelity” – Great soundtrack. Great script. Somehow makes you root for a completely unlikeable guy. Top Five of all time.

 

“Fight Club” – This had a huge influence on me in high school. All around solidly well done. Endlessly quotable. It feels really current, 22 years later…

 

“The Matrix” – Made me want to get into filmmaking in a legitimate way. There were many attempts at mimicking “bullet time” with tripods on wheels.

 

“Porco Rosso” – Japanese Anime – One of Studio Ghibli’s best. It’s so charming and beautiful. It’s a sea pirate/bounty hunter caper set in 1929 over the Adriatic Sea. What’s not to love?

 

“In the Mood for Love” – It’s a mood of a movie and I love that. There’s barely any dialogue and it’s all just dreamy stares and beautiful wallpapers and dresses. I finally grabbed the score on vinyl recently and it’s an absolute must.

 

Favorite TV program(s)? Why?

“Pushing Daisies” – So colorful and fun and goofy. I want to live in it.

 

“Succession” – Maybe the greatest TV show of all time. No, really. The way in which all these rich a-holes screw each other over left and right is such a delight to behold. Nick Britell’s opening theme song is KILLER.

 

“Cowboy Bebop” – It’s got the greatest score in TV history. The perfect mix of action, drama, and comedy. Noir and Western. Interesting, troubled characters. A ton of movie and music references. So much style.

 

“The Simpsons” – Yes, I am in the “early seasons” camp. There’s no denying that probably 15% of all the words out of my mouth are Simpsons quotes or references.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

I’ve been fortunate enough to work with many people who have been mentors to me. I don’t think there’s one person I’ve worked with who hasn’t been willing to share their knowledge, give me tips and tricks, and connect me with their friends and colleagues.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

“Don’t give up” and “it’s never too late.” Classic advice.

 

My description of how I went from email to internship to apprentice sounded really simple and easy, but what I didn’t include was that when I became John’s intern, I was already 27. I had tried many routes in 3 separate cities to get to where I am now and hit a lot of walls along the way.

 

Conversely, the pandemic has allowed us to realize we can change our minds. You can work your whole life toward something and then, after doing it a while, realize it’s not for you. And that’s ok. Getting there is an important step, too.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

I’ve called or emailed many times for clarity on a contract or having paychecks audited. They’ve always been extremely helpful.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

Let’s stay as motivated and as engaged as we are right now. As I write this, we’re a few weeks past having a proposed deal with the producers after such an enormous turnout for a strike authorization. It’s been nice to feel truly unified within our local, and together with the other 13 locals.

 

Kim Huston is on Twitter @kimhuston.

 

Compiled by David Bruskin. 

ADAM PEARSON - ASSISTANT EDITOR

November 2021

Where are you currently employed?

ABC Television / eOne.

 

Current projects?

“The Rookie,” Season Four.

 

Describe your job.

Assistant editing is really dualistic. There’s all the technical stuff: dailies intake, media organization and QC, prep for the editor, spot checks and vendor turnover, but it also requires the ability to flip and do a lot of creative work. Preliminary sound design, temp visual effects, temp ADR, watching scenes with the editor and being a second set of eyes on cuts… you have to be able to flip between right brain and left brain pretty often. It’s one of my favorite things about the work.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

When I was in middle school, I saw a rerun of a show called “Movie Magic.” That was the first time I realized making movies, television, all these stories and worlds that were so captivating to me—that was an actual job a person could have. From that moment, I was doomed to pursue it.

 

Who gave you your first break?

My path has been pretty winding, so there’ve been quite a few breaks. I started training and working as an actor and fell in love with production through that. Started freelance producing and directing, which led me to editorial. At each step in the journey, I got huge breaks thanks to people I will be grateful to for the rest of my life. The break that brought me here (after deciding to leave unscripted editing for the scripted world, grinding night assist shifts, scraping together qualifying hours anywhere I could) came from a wonderful and talented scripted editor named Kurt Courtland.

 

What was your first union job?

Assisting on a BET drama called “Games People Play.” I was working as a swing for two unscripted shows and six ongoing development projects in the same building where “Games” was posting. I had gotten to know the “Games” team around the building, and they knew most of my story. Kurt’s assistant (yup, the same Kurt) got bumped up about a month or so in. When he did, Kurt knocked on my door and asked if I was interested in assisting him for the rest of the season. He doesn’t know this, but the second he left my office, I jumped up out of my chair and actually danced. He’s a fantastic editor to work with, and I will be forever grateful that he took a chance on me.

 

What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?

I’m extremely proud of the most recent show I worked on, “Dopesick.” It’s an immensely powerful story about something that has absolutely decimated the entire country. I have people from my life who bore the fallout from the obscene greed and despicable lies that fueled the opioid epidemic in this country. Being part of telling that story has been one of the highlights of my career, so far.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

One of the hardest parts of the job, in my opinion, is respect. It’s much too easy to find people who don’t respect your work. I have been fortunate to work with people who not only understand the job I do, but who respect what it takes to do that job and do it well. I have also encountered a large number of people who, whether intentionally or unintentionally, commoditize assistants and, frankly, don’t give a damn. The only way to overcome this is simply to find those people you respect who, in turn, give a shit about what goes on behind your bay door. Anyone who acts differently – learn to spot ’em early.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

Hands down, the most fun I’ve had on any show was on the second season of “The Rookie.” That post crew is one of the best groups of people in the world. I think the most fun I’ve ever had on that show was for an episode with a scene that took place in a crowded bar where karaoke was going on in the background. Of course, they didn’t shoot the karaoke audio on set, so we needed temp ADR. The entire post team packed shoulder to shoulder into my tiny bay (this was pre-COVID, in case anyone’s toes curled up just then) and proceeded to belt out “Don’t Stop Believing” with the most amazingly over-the-top energy we could muster. It was absolute magic.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

My focus is to do the best work I can as an assistant and work my way into editing I’ve been fortunate to find magnificent editors who have been extraordinarily generous with their experience and given me not only the opportunity to cut, but the benefit of their feedback and guidance. I aim every time to make the most of those opportunities and put them to use in furthering my craft.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

Oh, man, so many things. I love reading, the outdoors, learning languages. I was a low-level competitive gamer for a minute. It’s less a question of passions and hobbies than it is a question of having time to engage in those things in a meaningful way. Even now…I’m finishing up writing this at the end of a 14-hour day. I ate dinner in front of my computer. The work requires so much from us that when it comes to what we do outside of it… a lot of the time, the only answer is to get whatever sleep we can.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

  • “Jaws” is a clinic in pop structure and pacing. So is “Jurassic Park.” (“Jurassic Park” is also the prime standard of being judicious and effective with your CGI.)
  • “The Conversation” is an exceptional example of editorial craft (and don’t forget sound design).
  • The original “Ghostbusters” is seamlessly written.
  • “Ikiru” is a marvel of stillness and depth of emotion.
  • “The Lord of The Rings” Trilogy is a soup to nuts example of movie magic: the miniatures and bigatures, set construction, perspectives, visual effects, makeup, production design… it’s an astonishing piece of work.
  • “Paprika” is a masterpiece of visual storytelling.

 

Favorite TV program(s)? Why?

  • “Hannibal” is one of the most beautifully designed and shot series I’ve seen recently.
  • “Legion” was bold AF and I loved every second of it.
  • I tie “Archer,” “Ted Lasso,” “Mythic Quest,” and “Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” as the tightest writing around right now.
  • “Big Mouth” adeptly and honestly tackled subjects other shows wouldn’t touch with a ten-foot pole, or would butcher in the attempt.
  • “Full Metal Alchemist Brotherhood” is a beautiful example of balancing deep intertwining character arcs in concert with an epic overarching plot.
  • “PEN15” is a spectacle of amazing performances and pure heart.
  • The fearless simplicity of Genndy Tartakovsky’s “Primal” should be required viewing for any story-teller.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

Since I began my union journey, I’ve been fortunate enough to work with several talented editors. Each of them has shaped me as a professional and as a person. For me, there has been a very “village” feel, and it’s one of the things I love the most about this union and this work.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

When you’re starting out, be diligent, be dedicated, and don’t be intimidated. Ask questions and commiserate with peers you respect, let people know you’re passionate about pursuing the work, and prove it to them through your actions.

Once you get in the door, it’s extremely easy to get a bad case of imposter syndrome. Just relax, be patient, do your job, take your time, and ask for help. Don’t let people who try to squeeze you break you down. You made it here, so you belong here. You know what you need to. What you don’t know, you can figure out.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

Oh yes. I won’t name names, but I worked as an LA local on a remote location show that, among other things, skimmed my per diems and tried to gaslight the whole post team out of two weeks’ pay and relocation transportation costs when we moved post back to LA at the last minute. It was a wall-to-wall trash fire. After approaching the producers directly didn’t work, we got 700 on the phone. They got that straightened out real quick.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

Joining the union changed my life. I am grateful every day for the knowledge, the opportunities, and the kinship, not just within 700 but industry-wide. We are different locals, but we are one union, and we are standing together now in a way that’s never been seen before. We have the power and the opportunity to reshape this industry forever and for the better. And if we are bold enough to dare, I believe that we can.

 

Compiled by David Bruskin. 

 

Want to be featured in What Our Members Do? Email scollins@editorsguild.com.

JASON BROTMAN - ASSISTANT EDITOR, BOARD MEMBER

October 2021

Where are you currently employed?

I’m currently working for Sony Pictures Television.

 

I also serve as an assistant editor representative on the Editors Guild board of directors (not a paid position).

 

Current projects?

Season 3 of Amazon’s “The Boys.”

 

This is the last year of my first term on the board.

 

Describe your job.

As an assistant editor, my priority is to maintain a well-organized and technically sound Avid project. Clean and disciplined media management is key. The modern duties of the position include temp sound effects and scoring work as well as rough visual effects. We refine and refine the show until it’s in its best possible form. That’s lock. From there, I do turnovers, which essentially means taking the show apart and sending the pieces out to third-party vendors (sound editing and mixing, picture online, and visual effects) for the final polish.

 

As a member of the Board of Directors, I attend monthly meetings that include the Guild officers and our National Executive Director, Cathy Repola. We oversee some administrative duties, but most of our time is devoted to examining issues our members face and working on ways to address them; planning social and professional enrichment events; and long-term initiatives to strengthen and prepare the Guild for the future.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

For as long as I can remember, I’ve had a passion for entertainment of all kinds, particularly TV/film and video games. My grandfather and I used to go to the movies on a regular basis, and there was nothing like the elevated experience and escape it would give me. I would be totally engrossed. I was very fortunate to attend a middle school and high school with video production classes, so I actually began editing at age 11, first with iMovie and then later on Final Cut Pro. I realized I had a knack for it and I was off to the races.

 

I’ve always been very politically active and concerned with the circumstances facing average Americans, especially workers’ rights. So when things were heating up during the 2018 Basic Agreement negotiation, I discovered the Guild community online and got vocal. After I attended a general membership meeting, a Board member suggested that I come to a Board meeting as a guest, which any member can do. I didn’t even know about the Board of Directors prior to that, but it felt like a place I would have something to contribute. So I ran for election that fall and won an assistant editor seat.

 

Who gave you your first break?

My very first gig was a travel show called “Drinking Made Easy” on HDNet (now AXS TV). I’m grateful that the host, Zane Lamprey, took a chance on a kid literally two days out of college and hired me directly to the assistant editor position.

 

What was your first union job?

Assistant editing for Nona Khodai, ACE, on season 2 of NBC’s “The Night Shift.” I am forever grateful that she gave me a leg up to the union world.

 

What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?

Easily, the thing I’m most proud of is my work on “The Boys.” It’s the most technically challenging and ambitious show I’ve ever worked on. It’s the show I’ve spent the most time on, every season pushing me in ways that have improved my craft and confidence as an editor. I’m also very happy to say that, pound for pound, it’s the best group of people I’ve worked with, from our showrunner Eric Kripke on down. Respect abounds and it’s truly a family.

 

As for my work with the board, I’m proudest of creating and co-chairing the Local 700 Young Workers Group with my fellow board member, Shiran Amir. The work we’ve been doing to engage and educate young and new members has been extremely gratifying and inspiring.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

So far, the biggest challenge I’ve found in my career has been to create and preserve a work-life balance that maintains my mental health and personal commitments to loved ones. The reality is, if you’re experienced enough that the work is not too hard or stressful, what can get in the way of a healthy work-life balance is if people don’t treat you with respect. The way I’ve solved this is to make gig decisions based largely on whether a crew has a reputation for being good people. I pride myself on working with some wonderful human beings and purposely avoiding those who would make my job, and subsequently my life, a nightmare.

 

The biggest challenge on the Board is learning to have patience. It’s a deliberative body of roughly 50 people and, like any deliberative body, getting major things done can be a slow process. Being assertive but respectful is key.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

For season 2 of “The Boys,” the Aquaman-like character, The Deep, has a hallucination on mushrooms where his gills talk to him about his love life, and they do a duet of “You Are So Beautiful.” The gills ended up being voiced by Patton Oswalt (which was phenomenal!), but until that happened, we had to do temp ADR for the scene. We weren’t sure who was going to sell it best, so we ended up recording about five different people in the office. It. Was. Ridiculous.

 

The most fun I’ve had at a Guild function is the annual installation dinner. It’s a formal affair  where we celebrate the new members of the board and honor those leaving. Good food, great conversation, free drinks. ‘Nuff said!

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

I’d very much like to be editing full-time. I have an Additional Editor credit and a shared Editor credit under my belt for, respectively, “Home Before Dark” and “Resident Alien.” I’ve been assistant editing for 10 years, and I really feel like I’m ready for the next stage in my career.

 

In five years, I’d also love to be on my third term as a board member!

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I’m an information geek of all kinds, so I have a long list of podcasts that I’m learning from all the time. I’m a big gamer and think it’s very much an underappreciated artform. I love trying new restaurants, cooking, hiking, and I’m a BIG political junkie.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

One of my all-time favorites is “Good Will Hunting.” Growing up in the Bay Area suburbs where the focus is much more on sports and business than the arts, I often felt like the black sheep. Will’s experience of seeing things through a very different lens than the people around him really resonated with me. It’s also got Robin Williams’ Oscar-winning performance and a fantastic soundtrack.

 

I’m also a huge fan of sci-fi (“Interstellar” and “Arrival,” to name a couple), and I’m a fan of basically everything David Fincher has ever done.

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

“Breaking Bad” because, come on. “Lost” will always have a special place in my heart because it was the first serial show that I deeply got into. And “The Office”—endlessly re-watchable and just pure joy.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

I’ve been very fortunate to work with a number of brilliant editors over the years. Each of them left an impression on me and helped me hone my craft, so I don’t have a single mentor per se. I actually prefer it that way. I love that I’ve received a number of different perspectives from a diverse array of editors, all with different goals and individual paths that got them where they are.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Work hard, be curious, pay attention, and try to achieve a certain level of speed. As soon as possible, find the most efficient but precise way to do something. It makes the job easier and your day shorter. More time at the office does not automatically equal better quality work. It’s vital to set personal boundaries. Let your professional performance speak for itself and trust that people on the other end will honor that. If they don’t, those aren’t the kind of people you want to be working with going forward. There is plenty of content out there. Don’t waste your time and energy working with people who are abusive or selfish.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

I was on a show that had a luxurious schedule, so there were a couple weeks where very little was going on in editorial. I was told by the associate producer that the teams would be staggered so one editor and their assistant would take the week off and then swap the next week. This didn’t sit right with me, so I reached out to the Guild for clarification. It turns out this is a little-known part of the contract called a “hold call” or “relay call” and it’s not allowed. Post jobs by nature are of long duration, so an employer who tells you not to work one week is essentially preventing you from having a paycheck from anywhere that week, because chances are highly unlikely that someone in post would be able to find and fill one week of availability, particularly on short notice. The Guild reached out to labor relations at the studio and the plan was scrapped. No missed paychecks for us!

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

This business can be brutal. The hours can be long. The treatment can be harsh. The work can be tedious. There’s no shame in being affected by this. It doesn’t make you less good at your job or less deserving of your position. If you’re struggling, open up to your colleagues about it. We need to be there and support one another. If you’re working 12-hour days on a regular basis and it’s taking a toll on you, no one should view you as weak. You’re human. Don’t let anyone, whether it be a producer or a fellow union member, make you feel like you’re acting entitled simply for wanting some level of normalcy in your life. It’s exploitative, abusive, and toxic, and we have to weed it out wherever we find it.

 

Never forget that being in a union means we are part of a large family of fellow members, and we have the Guild standing behind us. We have a commitment to each other that, at its best, protects and advances all of us.

ALEX ROMANO - FINISHING EDITOR

September 2021

Where are you currently employed?

Stampede Post Production, Hollywood, Calif.

 

Current projects?

Trailers and commercials for theatrical, broadcast, and social media distribution for numerous studios, including Amazon Prime and Lionsgate.

 

Describe your job.

After receiving the turnover from the offline creatives, I conform the final sequence from feature footage and clips, perform a color grade and add necessary graphics. Once our audio mixer finishes a proposed mix, these are married and sent to the studio representatives for approval. Once approved, distribution files are created with various release versions (release date, “In Select Theatres”, “Now Streaming”, with or without continuous logos, etc.), and each are converted into various social media aspect ratios. One original sequence can result in dozens of distribution files.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

In high school, we had a student-produced TV news show that was broadcast to the school during homeroom each week. Students performed all aspects of news production: shooting, reporting, editing, anchoring. The part that was always the most enjoyable for me was the editing, even on the primitive equipment available at the time. It was at that point that I learned that I love collaborative creation through the art and craft of editing.

 

Who gave you your first break?

I used connections made through my time at USC. Through working as a student at the Interactive Television Network in the School of Engineering and as a student in the School of Cinema, I created relationships with co-workers, fellow students, staff, and faculty. After working at USC for a number of years after graduation, I was able to use these relationships to help me be “in the right place at the right time” to establish myself in the industry. Rik Breniser, a co-worker at the time, helped me get my first job. From there, each job change became an opportunity to grow into new technology and different aspects of editing. Every job I have held in this industry has been the result of networking with my connections made through the years.

 

What was your first union job?

My first job in “The Industry” was as a union videotape operator at Consolidated Films, Inc. (CFI), but that only lasted a few months before I started as a videotape operator/supervisor at VidCom Post, a non-union facility. In my next job, at 525 Post, I was able to transition to working as an online editor, finishing music videos and commercials. That work transitioned to movie trailers and then to Digital Intermediate conform.

 

What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?

The credit I am most proud of is “The Hurt Locker,” which won Best Picture in 2010; I received credit as Online DI Editor and as Visual Effects Artist, finishing over 70 visual effects shots. In the execution of the feature, I was called on to add muzzle flashes, explosions, debris, remove crew and bystanders, and in some cases, help re-envision the look of some scenes. I also lead the team that augmented the explosion near the beginning of the movie, to make sure it was convincingly lethal. Through all of this, I was able to approach the work with confidence in my craft and the tools at hand, so that most of the shots were approved on first presentation to the director.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

The credits that were the most fun were those at my previous (union) job at Level 3 Post. I worked as Online Editor for the first seasons of “Ted Lasso” and “The Flight Attendant.” Second to that were the Marvel TV shows for Netflix (“Daredevil,” Jessica Jones,” etc.). In every case, I have the most fun when everyone works together providing their own contribution to the final product. The job of creation is best accomplished when it is the work of a team of collaborators.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

Contemplating plans for a comfortable retirement.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I love creating, whether that is model railroading, woodworking or home renovation. I also love the satisfaction and meaning that comes from volunteering.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

Most of the movies I have worked on have been lasting favorites, especially those that have a meaningful message that helps improve society, like “The Hurt Locker” and “Dreamgirls.”

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

I have always been a fan of the “Star Trek” TV series, all versions.  The optimism for humanity that is portrayed strikes a chord with me.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

I have always looked up to Steve Scott as a model for my work. We worked together at 525 Post, mostly doing high-end commercials. One such commercial, for Mercedes, won the Clio for Best Visual Effects. Steve’s work ethic has always been to strive for perfection and to never let compromise affect the final product (or at least as little as possible). He has a keen eye for color and composition which has helped him become one the top colorists in the world. He also has an eye for imperfections, sometimes down to the pixel, that, if left, would diminish the final product.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Every job I have had in this industry has come about through the assistance of people I have met and formed relationships with over the years. My advice to anyone looking to thrive in this industry is to create close relationships with everyone you come in contact with. You never know who will be the person that provides the lead to “being in the right place at the right time.” I would also advise to always remain humble and willing to help others. Very rarely is arrogance and narcissism beneficial.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

Not yet.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

I learned a very important lesson during my first full-time job in this industry from an editor named Marcus Weiss. He was working freelance, filling in for a vacationing staff editor, while I was supervising the videotape room. The relatively new tape op working with Marcus had just been yelled at by one of the staff editors for not being fast enough at her job. And as luck would have it, the work demands reached her limit and the editor was left waiting for her to complete a series of tasks. Marcus came into the tape room, and the tape op cringed for the yelling that was sure to come. Instead, Marcus said he was there to help and could teach her to be more effective at her job. At the end of the day,  Marcus came back to the machine room to thank her for all her hard work. She was amazed at his grace and said so. This was Marcus’s response, which has stayed with me: “This is a small town and we are sure to work together in the future. If I can do something now that will help you be better now, you’ll be that much better when we meet again.” I find it encouraging that there are Marcuses out there, and I strive to be one myself. Maybe you’re one of them—or could be.

 

Compiled by David Bruskin. 

MARILYSE VEGA MARTINEY - DIGITAL OPERATOR Y-16

August 2021

Where are you currently employed?

The Walt Disney Studios

  

Current projects?

Disney+ content and shorts. Also features and theatrical media distribution.

 

Describe your job.

For theatrical releases, I assist with asset prep by requesting the media needed to create DCPs [Digital Cinema Packages].

 

For Disney+, I take subtitle files created by vendors and sync them up with the content. Sometimes the timed text files line up perfectly, but a lot of the time (particularly with old titles) we need to do frame rate conversions, remove reel breaks, or reject a file due to issues such as corrupted data. I enjoy the subtitle work—it’s a great opportunity to use editorial techniques, and also because I love the content. When “Fantasia” (1940) and “Fantasia 2000” (1999) were re-released earlier this year with lots of never-before-seen bonus features, I spent a solid three days watching more of the content than exporting subs!

  

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

It’s more like I fell into the work than became interested in it. I had been working in filmmaker client services at the Digital Media Center (where all the digital operators work), which gave me a lot of facetime with their team. When I was ready to find my next career adventure, it just so happened they were looking for a new operator specifically to help with Disney+ work. As soon as I could, I scheduled one-on-one meetings with pretty much all the digital operators to learn more about what they do to see if it could be a good fit. Once I realized the work would be way more technical than the job I had and would make me a part of the pipeline versus waving from the sidelines, I knew this would be the perfect next step for me. Joining the media distribution team opened so many doors for me, and I’ve learned so much. Joining the union was an added bonus.

 

Who gave you your first break?

Craig Tanner has given me my first break to get into editing. He will be my new boss when I start as an apprentice editor with Marvel!

 

What was your first union job?

This one, Digital Operator!

 

What credits or projects are you proudest of, and why?

I’m proudest of being a part of the team that helped launch Disney+. I adore all the content Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm, and all the other sister companies produce. It has always been very important to me that I care about the content I’m working on; otherwise, what’s the point of working for a specific company (besides paying bills)? Watching the world erupt with excitement over Disney+ was the most amazing magical moment. Words truly cannot express how elated and proud our team was. My co-worker said it best: now he understands how musicians feel when they drop a new album.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

One of the biggest challenges I’ve ever had was when I got furloughed last year because of COVID. Before that, I’d only ever had to look for a job, so it was a total gamechanger when I realized I had no control over when I could go back to it. At that time, I told myself it would be a good brain break; but after two or three months turned into six months, I was nearing a breaking point. I started to look into other jobs, but I didn’t want to derail the career plan I had mapped out in my head, so I was hoping and hoping I could return to work soon. As much as I loved being able to relax and watch limitless movies and binge TV, I would never want to experience that again. I was able to get through that time by doing lots of personal editing projects, learning to knit and play the ukulele, staying closely connected with family, and lots and lots and lots of puppy cuddles! Also special shout-out to my partner, Brad Rude, for being my rock every single day during such a hard time.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

At Disney, we work hard and we play hard, so I’ve acquired a lot of fun memories and had amazing opportunities working on the lot. Just to name a few: volunteering at the Christopher Robin premiere and being able to see legendary Disney songwriter Richard Sherman; the awesome Halloween parties where high-level executives judged the costume contest; shadowing sound engineer Doc Kane (another legend!) on the ADR stage and watching a loop group perform; and calling out my co-workers on their Dad Jokes. But the most fun I’ve had at work is watching everyone’s inner kid come out during these fun events. I’ve learned that being able to let loose and have solid fun while still being respected for your hard work is a very important factor in career success and enjoyment.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

Even though COVID has taught me to focus more on the now, I guess that in five years, I hope I’ll be an assistant editor kicking ass in the industry and loving every second of it. But circumstances change so quickly, sometimes without choices or options, and staying adaptable and relevant might become more important than the master career plan I dreamed up during my college days. Actually, I’ve had to alter every step of my plan along the way, yet I’ve still ended up being exactly where I’ve dreamed of being. That just goes to show there’s truly no one way of making it—and also that I’ve been very fortunate.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I grew up dancing ballet, which I still do today.  I dance with the LA Unbound dance company twice a year during non-COVID times. I love the performing arts, and LA Unbound is a wonderful community to be a part of. We still dance because we love it, not to be competitive or judgmental about choreography or technique. I’m going to hold on to dancing for as long as my body and work schedule allow. It’s a terrific outlet for stress release, stimulates creativity, and pushes personal boundaries. Ballet is my go-to dance type, but before COVID, I was cast in a heels piece—think hip hop dancing but in high heels. It felt amazing to learn a new style that challenged me. Dance has also ingrained in me so many great work habits that I use every day.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?  Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

I don’t like answering this question because I don’t have favorite movies or TV programs. Each new production I see adds to my experiences and broadens my scope. I can’t compare or favor one cinematic effort over another. I can tell you what movies I don’t like: films directed by Quentin Tarantino (sorry not sorry).

 

Do you have an industry mentor?
No… but it’s something I’ve been working toward. I like getting different perspectives on situations, so I’ve made an effort over the years to have one-on-ones with as many people as my shyness would allow. I never approach those conversations wondering if this one person could be my sole mentor. Instead, I think about what I might learn from this one piece of the giant puzzle that is the industry.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

“Being adaptable” and “staying relevant” are phrases I’ve heard so many times since I started working full time at Disney, especially from folks in technology teams. My advice would be that it’s incredibly important to have or be willing to learn new skills. I’ve always loved post production because of how much the process and technology evolves, but the importance of my evolving along with it had never crossed my mind.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?
As a young one, I feel so honored to be a part of the MPEG. The union fights for—and the members benefit from—a stable foundation for making a living in the film industry. I had only been on the corporate side of jobs and job benefits before this, so I didn’t really understand what being a part of a union meant, let alone this specific union. So sincerely, from the bottom of my heart, thank you everyone for what you do to make this community and support possible.

 

Compiled by David Bruskin. 

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