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What Do Our Members Do?



MYRA LOPEZ - ANIMATION EDITOR

July 2019

Where are you currently employed?

Netflix Animation Studios.

 

Current Project?

Maya and the Three, a Netflix original animated mini-series set in Mesoamerica, which is currently set to premiere in 2020.

 

Describe Your Job.

I am currently the lead editor on Maya and the Three. I oversee the editorial team for animatics through post-production. I work creatively side by side with the show’s writer and director, Jorge Gutierrez. Together we work on everything from pacing and timing for dramatic and comedic impact to experimenting with music and sound effect styles. Additional duties include working closely with production to develop a harmonious workflow between editorial, the story team, audio departments and our overseas animation studio.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I have always loved animation. I studied animation and illustration at Cal State University Fullerton where I received my Bachelor in Fine Arts. During my senior year in college I did an internship at Nickelodeon Animation Studios and after graduation I was hired as a production assistant at Nickelodeon. A few months into the job, the post-production team at the studio needed assistance and I transferred into the post-production department. I remained there for 3½ years doing post on various Nickelodeon series. I was a post-production assistant, post-production coordinator and even supervised a few shorts and pilots. It was during this time that I became interested in editing and decided to go back to school part-time to become an editor.

 

Who gave you your first break?

I was about 3 months into my editing courses when one of the line producers I was working with, Miken Wong, offered me an editing job. I would have to work full-time as an editor and go part-time to school on nights and weekends. It was challenging and exhausting but she knew I could do it. Miken took a huge chance on me, for which I am forever grateful.

 

What was your first union job?

My first union job was at DreamWorks Animation Television on The Adventures of Puss in Boots.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why?

Nickelodeon’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles — I was one of the editors for Seasons 1 and 2. This series was the first action series I edited. I learned a lot from the series show runner about story and cutting action. The knowledge I gained from working on this project has been essential in my career and I’ve been able to apply it to other projects. I was also able to cut the first few Comic-Con trailers for the series as well, which was new and exciting for me and a lot of fun.

Maya and the Three — the mini-series I’m currently working on. Growing up, I always dreamt of seeing a Latina heroine on TV or in the movies and now I’m working on a mini-series where the main character is a Mesoamerican heroine. Although it’ll be a year or so before its release, I feel incredibly proud and lucky to be involved in this project and I’m excited for everyone to see it.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

There is so much footage and audio coming in almost daily that at times it is difficult to keep track of where everything is. Something that has been helpful is keeping a work diary. Every day I jot down what the editorial team worked on and what still needs to get done. This way there is little room for anything to get missed.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

I was hired as an editor at DreamWorks Animation TV a few months after it had been established. Those first few months at the company were slow for the editors as productions ramped up. All of editorial had offices in the same hallway and this meant we all went on adventures together. We enjoyed many long lunches, daily tea times, food challenges, lots of birthday celebrations and many YouTube videos. It was awesome; if only it lasted forever.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

I hope to be editing animated features.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I enjoy photography, playing my accordion and watching tons of Turner Classic Movies. I feel that I am constantly learning something new with all of these activities.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

The Nightmare Before Christmas and Sunset Boulevard are my favorites. The Nightmare Before Christmas is visually stunning and was a huge inspiration for wanting to study animation. Sunset Boulevard was one of the first classic films I watched that started me on a path watching and studying more classic films.

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

There are so many I love. A few that stand out to me are AnimaniacsTiny Toon AdventuresThe OfficeMad MenBreaking BadThe Handmaid’s Tale and The LeftoversAnimaniacs and Tiny Toon Adventures were cartoon series I watched as a kid that inspired me to want to draw and learn the art of animation. The OfficeMad MenBreaking BadThe Handmaid’s Tale and The Leftovers follow some complicated characters that I always find myself rooting for.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

When I started my career in editing at Nickelodeon Animation Studios, I worked with Jeff Adams. He was my industry mentor.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Take into consideration what you are making: Is it an action show? Is it a comedy or drama series? And watch television shows or films that relate to what you are working on so that you can learn about pacing and timing. Sound is important as well. In animatics we use temp sound effects and music and it’s important to have the right sounds to help convey the story. Studying all these things will make you a better editor.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

When I started working at DreamWorks Animation Television, the content I was working on was for streaming and I was not able to join the roster. The ‘New Media’ roster was formed instead and I was placed on that. None of the hours I accumulated at Nickelodeon working as an editor could be counted towards joining the normal roster because my title at Nickelodeon was “Supervising Picture Editor” and my title at DreamWorks was “Avid Editor.” I contacted the Guild and they negotiated for the editors at DreamWorks Animation Television to join the normal roster after 6 months of employment there.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

If you are in a position where you feel you are not growing, do something about it. Make your own path. There are tons of opportunities out there in this constantly evolving industry where you can make a place for yourself.

 

Compiled by Edward Landler      

 

Editor’s Note: To recommend a member (including yourself) to be featured on CineMontage.org, and the home page of the Editors Guild website, please contact edlandler@roadrunner.com.

MARY CROWLEY - TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

June 2019

Where are you currently employed?

I work freelance.  

 

Current Project?

The Rachael Ray Show, the talk and lifestyle show. We are going into Season 14 this fall, which will be my ninth season with the show.

 

Describe Your Job.

I always tell people that I am an “instantaneous editor.” I edit the show as it happens. My day-to-day responsibilities include keeping the switcher up to date and cleaned out, building effects for the show and switching the show. During the show, I am cutting cameras, running effects and feeding monitors.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I first became interested in switching when I was in college.

 

Who gave you your first break?

Kim Southwick! Kim was the production manager at KIDK-TV 3, the local CBS news affiliate in Idaho Falls, Idaho. When I was 15, he hired me as a camera operator for what was both my first job and my first TV job. I was so lucky to work in such a small market. While in high school, I was a camera operator, as well as stage manager, prompter operator and character generator (the station had a vidi-font machine — so old!). I was also the weekend photographer and writer for the evening news.

 

What was your first union job?

Rachael Ray was my first union gig.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why?

I have a lot of projects that I’ve been proud to be a part of. I am very proud to work on Rachael. We put out a beautiful product and I work with a fantastic crew. Over the last couple of years, I have had to opportunity to work on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and Sesame Street. All these shows require completely different skill sets from me, but they are all final products that I am super proud of.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

Truck work is probably the most challenging. You roll into a completely unbuilt show and you have a day or less to build every effect you need and to make sure that it will work effectively enough that your split-second decisions don’t hinder the flow of the show. If you don’t have a good truck engineer, it can be a very intensive build. It’s fun — like putting together a puzzle.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

I got to switch a show where British performance artist Millie Brown vomited paint all over Lady Gaga. It was part of a performance that Lady Gaga was doing at the 2014 South by Southwest (SXSW) Festival in Austin that Fuse.tv aired on the Internet. An hour before airtime, someone ran into the truck, told us, “The second song is where she will throw up,” and then left. None of us knew what that meant, until the second song started. It was an adventure. Really, even the worst show can be fun if you have a good crew.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

I would love it if Rachael was in its 18th season in five years. It’s a great work environment.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I love fermentation — getting my hands in the dirt and bringing life into a garden, or anything that I can use to express my creativity. That includes painting, music and crafting with my kids.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

The Philadelphia Story, especially for the banter between Katherine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart.

 

Favorite TV program(s)? Why?

I can’t say I have a favorite, but I just binged The Umbrella Academy and looooved it. It is so purposeful with its cinematography and editing. I enjoyed it for the story and its production values.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

Jon Pretnar and Mike Ser are probably the best technical directors I’ve ever worked with. They both are never-ending wells of information and creativity.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Do it as much as possible. It won’t matter how much you learn about the switcher if you don’t have the opportunity to get your chops. So much of what you do during the show is muscle memory and it’s important to build.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

Actually, no. I haven’t tapped into the Guild for assistance yet.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

We are on the crossroads of creativity and technology. How lucky are we?!!

 

Compiled by Edward Landler      

AMANDA NELLIGAN - STORY ANALYST

May 2019

Where are you currently employed?

MGM Studios.

 

Current Project?

Anything MGM gives me! Whatever is in front of me is my top priority.

 

Describe Your Job.

Definitely a desk job! I’m at my computer all day. I read scripts submitted for consideration, providing a synopsis and my analysis of whether they are a good bet for the studio — the pros and cons of premise, character, storyline, dialogue, etc. I also do in-depth notes on our in-house projects, assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the current script, with a focus on how to move forward with subsequent drafts.

The best part is a monthly Monday lunch meeting at the studio with all the creative executives, to discuss the status of their project slate. It’s a great opportunity to check in, get their feedback and feel a part of the bigger picture. The hard part is the isolation — although I’m so busy I barely notice.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I always loved movies, but attended Brown University, planning to go to med school. There I got involved with, and became president of, the Brown Film Society, which included other students who left college to make it in the movies in Los Angeles. I followed them and worked as an assistant to a literary agent, then as a creative executive at Disney/Touchstone, and as a vice president of development for Mark Johnson and Barry Levinson. I really like working with writers and working on story.

I left the business to get a masters degree in clinical psychology, but missed film. My husband’s a manager and I would give his clients notes. One client said I should start my own business, so I did! In 2011, I started ScriptGal.com, my own screenplay consultation and analysis business.

 

Who gave you your first break?

Literary agent Geoffrey Sanford, who hired an inexperienced college graduate to work in his office. More recently, my college friend Holly Sklar, who has been a story analyst for Warner Bros. for decades, alerted me to the MGM job.

 

What was your first union job?

My job at MGM is my very first as a union story analyst.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why?

I was an associate producer on a movie called Sniper. Not a perfect film, but I worked for the producer, so I was there from development through production and, then, through post-production. I learned how to cut and splice actual film. It was an amazing experience that I will always be grateful for.

I started my current job in February, so it’s completely new! I love being able to apply my years of film expertise to MGM’s current projects. For example, the studio had a new project come in and the first draft wasn’t great. It was unnerving to give them bad news, but they agreed completely. My opinions, and years of thoughtful consideration and analysis of film, really pay off.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

Proofreading is really hard. I’m trying to figure out a more foolproof way of not making dumb mistakes, mostly on the coverage. Another issue is time. I probably take more time with sentence structure and word flow than is needed, and MGM is on the high end in terms of requirements, 10 scripts per week, while other studios only ask for eight.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

Definitely the MGM lunch meetings. I love going into the offices and hanging out with all those Oscars. The execs are super smart, super nice and chic, plus that’s a reason to put on some lipstick and heels! I’ve also read some really fun books submitted to MGM that I wouldn’t have read otherwise.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

I would still like to be at MGM if the studio will have me. I find a lot of interesting projects are happening on “television” — meaning HBO, Showtime, Netflix, Amazon, Hulu… I hope MGM acquires a long-form outlet.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

Biking, hiking, reading, New York Times crosswords, cooking, baking. My husband and I met in Los Angeles but discovered we grew up two towns away from each other in Massachusetts. We go to Cape Cod every June; it’s like going back in time to childhood. Now we have a newly rescued dog, a husky named Jake.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

All of them?! The GodfatherThe Philadelphia StoryHome for the HolidaysIn the LoopMarathon ManAlien. Movies have shaped my entire life. I saw Jaws as a kid, then went to Martha’s Vineyard with my family and toured where the shark was. E.T. and Close Encounters spoke directly to me as a nerdy, awkward kid. I watched The Dirty Dozen and The Great Escape at my father’s knee, along with the first and second Dirty Harrys.

I like movies that achieve their objective, I don’t care how small; in fact, I applaud restraint. I love movies that have a clear filmmaker behind the camera. I love everything the Coen Brothers do. I love Tarantino — all of his films. I was gobsmacked to read he has a 10-movie plan and then he’ll be done. I hope not. I don’t like message movies. In terms of fun popcorn movies, I have watched Game Night a lot recently. It seems like a simple comedy but the themes and the film techniques are much deeper.

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

The Wire was amazing, except for Season 2. I grew up on M*A*S*H; it has yet to be surpassed in all of television; Hill Street Blues, as well. My husband and I were with everyone in terms of The Sopranos. I liked Dexter. I’m a huge fan of Better Things and think Pam Adlon has done better without Louis C.K. I love the dry archness of Veep. I never got into Game of Thrones, although I tried three times! I love all British crime/detective series.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

No! I would love to have one.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Be prepared to work long hours alone. For some people the stay-at-home aspect is great. It certainly works for me. But, be forewarned, this is an intensive, focused job with little feedback. You need to be confident in your own opinions. And it’s great to have dog to walk to break up the day!

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

Yes. MGM only gives its employees a half-day off on Good Friday, but the Guild guarantees a full day off for that holiday. I consulted with my field rep, who confirmed that indeed I and the one other story analyst at MGM get the whole day off. I pointed that out to my MGM studio liaison and she concurred. She didn’t know, and it was satisfying to educate her about our guidelines.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

I’m really new, but I’m so happy to be a part of this group. I have been alone and freelance for so long. Being part of a greater whole was literally inconceivable before February of this year. But here I am. I’m so thankful and ready to be part of this amazing community.

 

Compiled by Edward Landler        

Editor’s Note: To recommend a member (including yourself) to be featured on CineMontage.org, and the home page of the Editors Guild website, please contact edlandler@roadrunner.com

LARRY SEXTON - PICTURE EDITOR

April 2019

Where are you currently employed?

I currently work at the new Tyler Perry Studios (TPS) complex in Atlanta. A Madea Family Funeral was released in March. 

 

Current Project?

A yet-to-be-named movie project.

 

Describe Your Job.

As editor, many times I work directly with Perry on his movie projects. I am allowed the freedom to do the first cut, and then he will sit with me and go over it. I have a fun job, but the chance to work with the creative genius of Tyler Perry is simply an amazing experience. When not working on movies, I work on TPS’ television dramas, The Haves and the Haves Nots and If Loving You Is Wrong, both on the OWN Network.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I always loved the challenge of creating emotion, blending photography and telling stories within a single image. With a college degree in photojournalism and art, I started photography freelancing with the Minnesota North Stars (now Dallas Stars) pro hockey team. Today, these images are in the permanent photography collection at the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto.

 

I began editing and telling stories with film in news and production at a rural Minnesota TV station. I was able to shoot and process my own film, and edit and write the story. I enjoyed the rush of live news and telling the viewer what I had witnessed through film, copy and creativity.

 

Moving to Chicago, I started in post with Columbia Pictures Duplication as a tape operator. Over the years I’ve been a live sports technical director, color assistant, assistant editor, online editor, and online effects editor, and ended up as the first nonlinear tape-based editor in Chicago working on the Montage Picture Processor, one of the NLEs.

 

Who gave you your first break?

I’ve had many “first breaks,” starting with Len Perlman, who hired me from Columbia to work at Editel in Chicago. There, I worked with and learned from some of the most talented editors I’ve ever met. For my first break in TV show business, I thank Harpo Productions’ Dave Logan who hired me to work on The Oprah Winfrey Show. I thank The View‘s Candi Carter, producer Leslie Grisanti and Tyler Perry Studios senior vice president Will Areu for my position at TPS. For my break into movies, I thank Tyler Perry who personally believed in me to edit his movies.

 

What was your first union job?

Picture Editor on the TV series If Loving You Is Wrong at Tyler Perry Studios.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why?

My favorite video segment for The Oprah Show is the background piece I did on Stevie Nicks and Fleetwood Mac; the time pressures we worked under made it even more rewarding. Other notables would be Oprah’s Legends Ball doc for ABC, the NCAA Final Four open for CBS, and Cicely Tyson’s biography piece for the Kennedy Center Honors on CBS. Also, Boo! A Madea Halloween was not only a fun project, but the opportunity to experience the energy of audience laughter was unique — plus two weeks topping the box office made it really special.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

In Australia, U2’s Bono was the opening guest on The Oprah Show at the Sydney Opera House, and I was assigned the setup piece for the band. The night before the show, U2 recorded the song “Beautiful Day” at a concert, which I would edit with backstage interviews to make a two-minute segment. I needed to time the song so that at 1:45, while Oprah waited on stage, Bono would walk through the curtains to greet her there, singing the chorus with the video.

 

The segment was needed in the truck for the live show no later than 7:00 a.m. I was ready to go at 3:00 a.m., but the elements from the shoot didn’t arrive until after 4:00 a.m.

 

Bono ad-libbed lyrics with Oprah’s name in some verses; I needed to keep those verses but keep one of U2’s most popular songs from sounding edited and still hit the 1:45 timing mark. At one point, I almost took the song out of Avid and into Pro Tools so I could do sub-frame editing, but I finally got it to time and was able to re-edit some sections to blend by using riffs from other parts of the song to make the transition. I kept trying pieces over and over again until it worked…perfectly. I delivered the finished segment at 6:50 a.m. —10 minutes to spare.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

Working The Oprah Oscar Special telecasts was lots of fun. But the most fun was editing Bono and U2 for the Oprah live segment and seeing it play on the screens by the Sydney Opera House with Bono coming through the curtain to the music I edited, with 12,000 fans cheering. It was a real rush.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

Five years in this business is a long time. I enjoy finding new ways to tell stories that help others. Maybe a shift towards documentary filmmaking.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I escape to the quiet of the country or to the sounds of waves at the beach. I talk to and learn from people with different backgrounds and careers. I enjoy photography and doing art projects that encompass photography.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

Hands down, Caddyshack, an all-time classic. I’m kidding about the classic part, but when I started with Columbia Pictures, I was a VHS tape duplicator and Caddyshack was the movie I duplicated most often. I have seen it over 100 times and know most of the script lines. I’ve got that goin’ for me, which is nice.

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

BloodlineSeason 1 on Netflix, and Amazon’s GoliathSeason 1. I enjoy their creative show opens and the shows themselves have a good storyline blended with good cinematography and solid editing, a pleasure to watch. To relax, I get good laughs from older shows like SeinfeldEverybody Loves Raymond or Curb Your Enthusiasm. 

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

Tom Pyers, editor on Oprah’s recent After Neverland TV show, and Big Shoulders Digital Video Productions owner Frank Hanes in Chicago. We all need a peer in the business who can be honest with us, to bounce ideas off. Both Tom and Frank have been that for me, and we’ve also alerted each other to opportunities.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Watch a lot of different types of television shows and movies. Refer to print ads and design for ideas and come up with ways to incorporate those ideas into moving images. Have a solid core expertise, then expand your knowledge to offer clients other abilities. We can no longer be one-dimensional. We are in a creative, customer service business and are only as good as our last jobs. Put your client at ease. Always be positive! My favorite saying is, “How can I make your day better?” When you put others first, somehow everything seems to work out for the best.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

No. I’ve been fortunate, I guess.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

The industry is changing quickly, with lots of opportunities to go around. Network with others as much as you can. I don’t think there’s been a better time to be in the business.

 

Compiled by Edward Landler        

Editor’s Note: To recommend a member (including yourself) to be featured on CineMontage.org, and the home page of the Editors Guild website, please contact edlandler@roadrunner.com.

RICK OWENS - FOLEY ARTIST

March 2019

Where are you currently employed?

I’m pretty much a freelance Foley artist. I do work with Sony Pictures, been seen around Warner Bros., and spent time with a crew at Universal and on a few smaller independent stages. Currently, I work with mixer Darrin Mann at IMN Creative, a boutique post house. It’s a great group with some exciting projects on the horizon.

 

Current Project?

At IMN, I’ve been working on Deadly Class airing on SyFy Network. It’s a very cool project and really requires a lot of creative and detailed Foley. Darrin and I have completed seven episodes so far. After Deadly Class, I go back to Sony for the feature Spider-Man: Far From Home.

 

Describe Your Job.

As a Foley artist creating sound effects on a sound stage, I am responsible for bringing a natural human element to a sound track by re-creating the movements of characters as seen on screen: footsteps, clothes, props, etc. I used to jokingly say I was emotionally attached to the characters I was walking, but the reality is that emotions can be translated through Foley. As a sound effects artist, I also provide details in a car crash, a fist fight, a person escaping the rubble from a blown-out building, Spider-man’s webs and so on. Some years ago, John Roesch told me that anything could be Foley, and I believe that to be true.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

My first job involving Foley was at a small, independent sound house in the early ‘90s. Our crew of three would do a complete post sound package in five or six weeks — one week of simultaneous dialogue and sound effects editing, about a week to record and cut ADR, a week or less to shoot Foley, and a week or more of final dub. I gravitated toward Foley. I really enjoyed the physical part of the job and the creativity and performance it demanded.

 

Who gave you your first break? 

My dad, Larry Owens, who was a recording engineer in the ‘70s and ‘80s, learned dialogue editing and post sound from sound editor Norval Crutcher in the late ‘80s. As a kid, I was my dad’s assistant at the recording studios where he worked. This background has been super helpful in my Foley career because I learned about the other side of the glass technically. I like to say dad gave me my first job, but since then I got them all on my own.

 

What was your first union job?

My first union job was at Warner’s new Underground Foley Stage in 2009. My partner then was Monette Holderer, along with mixer Trevor Sperry. We were a tight-knit crew and developed our own workflow of categorizing Foley. We would record props in certain passes — a hands pass, an office pass (papers, books, writing, etc.), a food and drink pass, a chair pass, body falls, and then lump all the cool creative stuff into its own pass. Sadly, Mo passed away a few years ago.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why?

They say you’re only as good as your last project and the work we are doing on Deadly Class is fantastic. In many Foley moments, I put a lot of sparkle and detail on what could be construed as a simple sound. My first really big film credit was the WWII film Fury. We created all the interior movements of a Sherman Tank: loading the guns, adjusting the sights, creating creaks and squeaks and even simple sounds of the seats in the tank. The supervisor was intent on creating a period-accurate film, and Foley helped achieve that objective.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

The 2016 fantasy adventure Warcraft. When we began the project, much of it was still motion-capture guys in little gray jumpsuits. We went beyond that to create an environment of characters that would match what would ultimately be the sound of giant Orcs and their movements.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

I have fun most days except when the pressure is on to finish too much work in too short of time. Even then, it’s still fun. How many people get to do what we do? Some of the fun moments are getting to create an effect and using multiple layers. We’ll spend time to get it just right, usually with a low-end bass channel and build up sonically from there. Perhaps the most fun I have is during playback when we review our work for the day. Playback almost always brings a smile to my face — the fruits of the labor type of thing.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

My five-year goal would be to continue working with like-minded professionals and remain steady at it. Though doing the big features is obviously a thrill, staying consistent is important.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I’ve been married for 10 years and it is an amazing experience watching and helping my eight-year-old daughter grow up. She is much smarter than I. I’m also kind of a gear head. I have a beautiful 1963 Ford Falcon that has been heavily modified.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

One of my favorite movies is Forrest Gump. I always relate to the comings and goings of certain characters in the movie. The most touching moment is when Lieutenant Dan comes back and is sitting on the dock…and later when Dan makes peace with his creator. Another favorite is Saving Private Ryan. D-Day is still one of the most realistic pieces of filmmaking in history. Everything about that scene seems perfect to me.

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

I tend to watch non-scripted TV. I like shows about cooking and building cars. I’ve worked on so much scripted TV, it’s nice to get lost in something without so much of a story.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

My first Foley mentor was Paul Holzborn, a great Foley artist. I did my first major movie with him, John Carpenter’s Vampires in 1998. Years later, the one and only Gary Hecker, one of the best Foley artists in the business, invited me to work with him and he blew open the world of Foley for me. I learned that just about anything could be created on a Foley stage. We did Deepwater Horizon in 2016. We had the opportunity to create the most massive and complex sounds for the Deepwater Oil rig both before and after its catastrophic explosion.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Listen to a lot of movies and TV shows. Listen to how they sound, what creative choices are made for the mix, where Foley is featured and where music and effects are featured. Learn about sound. I’ve met younger Foley artists who just want to do Foley and get paid, but don’t really understand a lot about film or TV sound and where Foley fits in. Find somebody willing to train you; those people are out there. But for me, there was a certain amount of humility to ask for guidance from someone more experienced.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

Get involved and have your voice heard. If a certain situation or working condition doesn’t seem right, reach out and help be part of the change.

 

Compiled by Edward Landler 

Editor’s Note: To recommend a member (including yourself) to be featured on CineMontage.org, and the home page of the Editors Guild website, please contact edlandler@roadrunner.com.

CRAIG LO GIUDICE - ASSISTANT SOUND EDITOR

February 2019

Where are you currently employed?

I work at Sound Lounge Film + Television, an audio post-production company in New York City.

 

Current Project?

Season Three of High Maintenance for HBO.

 

Describe Your Job.

On our current project, I am coordinating files between all of the video editors, the audio editors (dialogue, ADR, Foley and sound design), the ADR engineer and the re-recording mixer. We also have another engineer working on projects besides High Maintenance and I help him with files and other things he needs assistance with, such as dialogue editing and cutting backgrounds. I also help with the ADR stage, elements and scripts, and have started to get into doing some records as well.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I discovered audio post while in school for audio engineering. Having always loved film (and having almost zero musical talent), it seemed like a perfect fit artistically and, to be honest, a good way to make a living. I knew some people in advertising who helped steer me toward the commercial world of audio post-production.

 

Who gave you your first break?

I worked briefly at a studio called Burst, which mixed mostly promo spots, before I was hired at Sound Lounge about 12 years ago. I worked there as an assistant engineer until I moved over to the film and television department — and joined the union — about 18 months ago. I’ve never been more satisfied with work and feel I finally have a career and not just a job.

 

What was your first union job?

My first union job was as a machine room operator for Season Two of High Maintenance.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why?

I would have to say High Maintenance. Besides it being the first union job I’ve been on so far, it’s an extremely well-done show and I think it really stands out in the somewhat crowded realm of scripted television. As an assistant, I don’t have much creative input, but every job begins and ends with the assistants. That being said, taking care of a lot of the little details and making sure everyone involved has everything they may need frees them up to concentrate on the creative side and really craft a quality finished product

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

After having worked in commercials for so long, the biggest challenge has been adapting to the very different workflow that long-form requires. Even after being in audio post for as long as I have, there is always something new to learn or something to improve upon.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

It’s always a lot of fun to host a “movie night” on the stage, have a few drinks and mock an awesomely bad film, getting some co-workers to watch an insane Japanese horror flick or just a good old John Carpenter/Kurt Russell double feature.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

I hope to be doing more editing, more mixing and more ADR.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

Cooking and bread baking have always been a passion. I also enjoy hiking all over the beautiful state of New York with my wife and our dogs.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

I’d have a hard time naming a favorite film in any particular genre, never mind an all-time favorite film. This is something that changes with age or even the seasons.

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

I’m currently working through Game of Thrones for the second time and, if you count multiple viewings of an entire series, I’d also have to say Parks and RecreationBreaking Bad is definitely up there, and I have to admit the wife and I have been through Gilmore Girls multiple times, as well as Fringe and Cheers. I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with The X Files and more recently, as a horror fan, I’ve also loved Ash vs Evil Dead. Of course, the list goes on and on… Too many shows, too little time.

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

Working on the commercial side at Sound Lounge, it would be mixer Glenn Landrum, who taught me the basics. After I started work on long-form projects and joined the union, it was sound editor Steve “Major” Giammaria who has helped me immensely in making the transition from commercials to film and television.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Work hard honing your craft, and learn as much as you can from everyone with whom you work.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

Luckily, I have not yet run into any instances where I’ve really needed to take advantage of much of what the Guild has to offer in the way of help or assistance.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

Keep up the fantastic work!

 

Compiled by Edward Landler      

Editor’s Note: To recommend a member (including yourself) to be featured on CineMontage.org, and the home page of the Editors Guild website, please contact edlandler@roadrunner.com.

RACHEL CHANG - ASSISTANT EDITOR

January 2019

Where are you currently employed?

Wolf Films.   

 

Current Project?

Season Four of Chicago Med.

 

Describe Your Job.

I prep dailies, organize paperwork and add temp sound and sometimes music. I also export cuts throughout the various stages of the episode and do temp VFX work. Toward the end of the offline process, I prep sound and picture turnovers and VFX turnovers if needed. A lot of organization is involved, and I try my best to maintain order throughout the season. All of the editors on Chicago Medare incredibly generous and often give the assistants scenes to practice cutting.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I was a film and visual arts major in college but it was all theory, no production or post-production. During the last year of college, I went to Paris for a semester abroad and on a whim signed up for a video production class. We wrote, directed and edited our own projects — and that’s when I discovered I had a passion for post-production.

 

Who gave you your first break?

Through a friend’s father, I met Mark Woollen of Mark Woollen & Associates, a movie trailer company. His company had an internship program and I was hired as an intern in January 2009. Five months later, I was offered a job as a receptionist/office assistant. I learned about movie advertising but, most importantly, I learned that editing was the right path for me.

 

What was your first union job?

The Voice. Interestingly, the opportunity came about during an orientation meeting at the Guild. This was the second break in my career and I thank post supervisor Jim Sterling for taking a chance on me, even though I had very little experience in reality competition.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why?

I am incredibly proud to be part of the Chicago Med family. They also took a chance on me because I had no scripted experience, but I had a couple of friends there who vouched for me. Chicago Med is the best team with whom I’ve had the pleasure to work, and it’s the most nurturing environment I have been in. We have a lot of love and support for each other.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

The Voice was my biggest show and most challenging project so far. To survive a show this size, I wrote as many notes as possible and referred to them when needed. It was overwhelming at first — there were so many little things to remember that I created a check list for specific tasks. I made several lists for myself over the years and shared them with other assistant editors.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

The most fun has been working on Chicago Med. It doesn’t feel like work when you’re surrounded by great people and no task is too mundane. I love watching a scene come alive adding sound effects and music. I also get to practice cutting some scenes, which is a pleasure and a great privilege.

I also enjoyed working as an online editor on The Voice and I particularly loved using the paint tool in Avid to hide crewmembers on stage. It’s an invaluable skill for an assistant editor because more and more shows demand VFX skills. I was able to transition from reality to scripted more easily because of my online skills.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

I hope to be editing TV shows five years from now, but I’m also interested in working in features, specifically as a VFX editor. I would love to be part of a VFX-heavy show or feature.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I love to bake, especially pies, and I’m looking into learning how to make Danish and Scandinavian food and desserts. My husband is half-Danish and I would love to incorporate more Danish culture into our everyday life.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

The Matrix inspired me to pursue a career in entertainment; I was 14 years old when it came out. I always loved movies and TV shows, but it was then that I felt the yearning to be part of something that big. It was so many things in one — innovative, thought-provoking and just fun to watch. In college I discovered Elevator to the Gallows8 1/2, The 400 Blows, etc. One of my recent favorites is Jim Jarmusch’s Paterson because it’s about a poet who is not bitter about making a living as a bus driver. It was refreshing to see an artist portrayed that way. I’m a huge fan of public transit, so I loved the premise.

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

I love The Americans; it may be about Russian spies in the US but it’s really about marriage. I love anything by Amy Sherman-Palladino and The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel may be her best yet. The beauty in Better Call Saul is that we know it’s really about the journey Jimmy is on to becoming Saul. The End of the F*cking World was a huge surprise because it was an homage to American road trip movies but set in England. It’s dark, funny and heart-breaking. Barry is original, but we can all relate to wanting to start fresh in a new city and perhaps a new identity. Henry Winkler is just amazing!

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

Editor Lillian Benson, ACE, has inspired me to get out there and participate more within our industry. She is a pioneer and I am eternally grateful for her kindness and advice. It’s a joy working with her every day.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

No one cares as much as you do about your career. Don’t say no to an experience because it’s not quite what you hoped for. Be kind and respectful, especially toward those who may be below your rank. Show people that you care about your work no matter how small it may seem. There will be days when you feel unnoticed or under-appreciated, but people notice. A positive attitude goes a long way — and gratitude takes you further.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

Some years ago, I left an advertising company (not Woollen & Associates) to work in non-union reality TV. During the exit interview, I requested a written letter stating that I had worked as an assistant editor there because my pay stubs did not list my job title. The company denied my request. I was extremely upset and reached out to the Guild for guidance. It was a place to air my grievances, and the Guild gave me hope for a better future. I realized how important it was to have the Guild behind me. (By the way, that advertising company recently closed up shop.)

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

I want to thank my fellow Guild members for showing their support over the summer during contract negotiations. We showed everybody what a mighty group we are, and I’m proud to be a member. No one makes it on her or his own. I wouldn’t be where I am without the help of fellow assistant editors and editors. Let’s continue to support one another at work and outside of work.

 

Compiled by Edward Landler      

Editor’s Note: To recommend a member (including yourself) to be featured on CineMontage.org, and the home page of the Editors Guild website, please contact edlandler@roadrunner.com.

A. HOBART YOUNG - DIGITAL OPERATOR

December 2018

Where are you currently employed?

I work at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, with Disney Digital Studio Services.

 

Current Project?

I have an ongoing staff position in Media Distribution. 

 

Describe Your Job.

I prepare localization assets for worldwide digital distribution and streaming. That involves collecting and creating localized picture elements — including main titles, locators, end credit sequences for live action, actual scene or background changes with text or images that are in the local language for animation, and dubbing credits for the foreign voice actors — to insert into masters that will be distributed around the globe. The main titles, locators and end credit sequences are created by Disney’s Title Graphics department in Burbank. For the animation pieces, Disney Animation and Pixar will create the identical scenes with the different languages for each market. 

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I was a teenager when I took a behind-the-scenes tour of KNBC with a family friend who was the community relations director at the station. The control room with all the lights must have influenced me because I took a television production class at my high school. The rest is history.

 

Who gave you your first break?

Falcon Cable TV’s local origination hired me while I was still in college. Later on, a co-worker went on to Wold International, a Los Angeles-based satellite communication service, and I followed him there. A few years later, another co-worker went to Compact Video, a Burbank video post-production firm; I followed her and started my post-production career there. 

 

What was your first union job?

Videotape duplication operator at Compact Video Services.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why?

I was the telecine assistant and later the editorial assistant at 4MC/Ascent Media working on ER from Episode One in 1994 to the very last episode in 2009. Over this same time, I also worked on shows like The Drew Carey Show in 1996 and 1997, Just Shoot Me! from 1997 through 2003, Third Watch from 1999 to 2005, The West Win, 1999 through 2006, Without a Trace 2002 to 2009, and Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip in 2006 and 2007. Plus and a few others that I can’t remember. ER overlapped all of these shows and it was the longest run on a single show that I have ever worked on. The producers we worked with on the show genuinely valued our contributions.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

The biggest challenge has been keeping up with the constantly changing technology and the new workflows that incorporate the new technologies. 

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work? 

The work itself is most often tedious and long. The fun comes from when you have good co-workers, because you spend so much time together that you become more like a family, and you know what kind of mischief you can get into with your siblings.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now? 

Still working… I say that with a laugh because in five years I should be very close to 30 years in the union and possibly retirement.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I enjoy playing basketball, softball and sometimes golf. I also like cooking and gardening.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

My favorites are Blazing Saddles for its satire of stereotypes, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon for its action combined with imagery, and Kill Bill for the action. 

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

JeopardyFox NFL Sunday, which is the most entertaining of all the pre-game shows; Man, Fire, Food — BBQ, do I have to say more?. Also Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations and the Huell Howser reruns on KCET. 

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

I have learned something from almost everyone with whom I have worked. Some of them have taught me a lot and some have taught me something small, but all of it combined makes a lifetime of experience that I have been able to use to keep viable in this industry. 

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

Keep on learning and embrace change because it is inevitable. The tools you use will change — and nowadays they change often — so don’t be afraid of something new. Be the one that others ask, “How do you do this?” And be nice to people on your way up because you want them to be nice to you on your way down.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement. 

Remember a cut is still a cut; it’s just that the blade changes.

 

Compiled by Edward Landler      

Editor’s Note: To recommend a member (including yourself) to be featured on CineMontage.org, and the home page of the Editors Guild website, please contact edlandler@roadrunner.com.

HARRY OXNARD - METADATA ANALYST

November 2018

Where are you currently employed?

I currently work as a metadata analyst for Sony Pictures Content Licensing.

 

Describe Your Job.

As a metadata analyst, it is my job to curate the metadata around Sony’s stock footage, film catalog and internal databases to make our content more discoverable for reuse. This means that I get to work on a lot of different projects that are always changing.

Some days I go through the dailies of a television show looking for stock footage that can be sold to another show. Other days I help with film clip research requests by scrubbing through a dozen movies looking for that perfect iconic moment. Pretty much every theatrical feature film at Sony is sent to my department before home entertainment release. We watch the movies and create scene-by-scene descriptions to make our favorite moments easier to find.

We also create metadata for use internally. Right now, we are working on a special project where we are watching every episode of the current run of Wheel of Fortune from the beginning to add these archival episodes to the current production database. We’ve already completed this project for Jeopardy!

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

I first became interested in movies when I was a very little kid watching Looney Tunes on TV. I knew that some of the jokes were about old movies I hadn’t seen, so as I got older I tried to figure out what they all were. This was back in the heyday of the art house video store, and I was lucky enough to live in a college town that had several, so a large portion of my youth was spent watching classic movies. At the same time, I developed a very deep love for photography, and I was always trying to get my hands on film, which soon turned into Super-8mm and video.

I also worked as a projectionist at a movie theatre in high school and as a manager of a video store while I was in film school. Later when I lived in New York, I worked as a non-union editor and I worked in a classic film photography archive. I also helped create a media archive for the Rhine Research Center, a famous paranormal research center in North Carolina. Stock footage felt like a natural fit for me, because I had experience with different film and video formats, as well as a love for working with large collections of film materials.

 

Who gave you your first break?

I actually found out about my current job as I was in the process of moving from New York to Los Angeles. I was driving somewhere in the middle of the country with all my stuff when I got an alumni newsletter e-mail about the job opening. I applied while on the road, went to the job interview the day after I arrived in Los Angeles, and I’ve been working there ever since.

 

What was your first union job?

My current job. I was unionized as a part of an arbitration settlement between Sony and Local 700. Before the settlement, I was a non-union temp with no benefits. Now I have real health insurance and a pension plan, which is something that seemed very far away when I was working as a non-union editor. I’m also a Member at Large on the Editors Guild Board of Directors.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

My job has been a real education in filmmaking because it allows me to experience the creation of cinematic form from many different angles. Not only do I get to see all the footage that doesn’t make it into the film, I also have to analyze the film itself on a frame-by-frame basis. At one point, we had a special project where we conformed old subtitle files to the new edited-for-television video files. I watched 50 episodes of Hart to Hart, and really developed an eye for unnecessary lines of dialogue. I think that it’s made me a better writer and a better filmmaker.

 

Jobwise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

Hopefully, I’ll still working at Sony Pictures Content Licensing. I’ve also written a feature film and I’m planning to make a short based on it in the next year or so.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why?

The projects I’m most proud of are my six-year-old daughter and my three-year-old son.

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

I think the best part of living in Los Angeles is all the incredible film screenings and archival gems that aren’t shown anywhere else. This year, I saw a projected Technicolor nitrate print for the first time, and I felt like I finally understood a form of cinematography I had studied my whole life. The great part about movies is that there are always more of them, and there’s always more to learn about how to make them.

I also love camping and traveling, which always give me a good excuse to break out a funny old camera.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

The Maltese Falcon — because that’s the movie that really made me want to see every classic film that I could lay my hands on.

 

Favorite TV program(s)? Why?

Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. Speedy Deliveryman Mr. McFeely’s documentaries on the show were my first exposure to the concept of filmmaking as something you could do yourself. He also gave me an important lesson about not quitting your day job. Muppet Babies must have given me an early love of stock footage and film clips. Mystery Science Theater 3000 and Joe Bob’s Drive-In Theater developed my love for B-movies. Bob’s Burgers is my favorite show that’s on today.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

I think the secret to survival in general is to always be learning and willing to try new things.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

Never underestimate the value of your labor. Every day we see billions of corporate dollars consolidating around intellectual property. The future will be based around information and our collective artistic endeavor is the portal through which this information takes its final form. No one stands to benefit more from this future than we do. The only things that limit us are our fear and lack of imagination.

Compiled by Edward Landler
Photo Jeff Schuman                      

 Editor’s Note: To recommend a member (including yourself) to be featured on CineMontage.org, and the home page of the Editors Guild website, please contact edlandler@roadrunner.com.

TAKAKO ISHIKAWA - SOUND EDITOR

October 2018

Where are you currently employed?

Sony Pictures Studios, where I usually do sound effects and design work for TV. During hiatus, and time permitting, I pick up freelance sound editing work. 

 

Current Project?

With Sony in hiatus, I am working a freelance job as a dialogue editor; I also cued and cut ADR and groups for a feature. Back at Sony, I will work on Empire and The Blacklist.

 

Describe Your Job.

Sound Editors are responsible for creating all the sounds in a movie or TV show (excluding music). Usually sound editing is divided into specific specialized tasks: dialogue, sound effects and design, Foley and music editing. All these editors prepare sounds for the final mix.

 

How did you first become interested in this line of work?

Intending to be a music studio mixer, I went to Boston’s Berklee College of Music, where I took a required class in synchronizing and creating sound for moving pictures. After graduation, I wanted to stay in the US to gain experience before returning to Japan, and Berklee sponsored a “practical training” visa to stay another year and, as with a work visa, have a paid job.

Advised that the West Coast had more work, I moved to LA. A mixer from when I was an intern recommended me to a music studio there, where I had to be an intern again…at minimum wage! I could not qualify later for a work visa at that salary. Then I looked for jobs in post-production sound. I was hired at Bouquet Multimedia, a post house, and worked as an assistant mixer and sound editor.

 

Who gave you your first break?

Wanting to work as a sound effects (SFX) editor, I applied for work at Nancy and John Ross’ Digital Sound and Picture (DSP), which had a cutting-edge way to edit SFX using music software. My first job at DSP was Hercules: The Legendary Journeys. Later, I worked on Xena: Warrior Princess and some features. Nancy and John helped me get a work visa and I worked there three years, developing the creative mind necessary for SFX editing.

 

What was your first union job?

Sound effects editor on the TV series Early Edition at Sony Pictures Studios.

 

Which of your credits or projects have made you the most proud and why? 

I’m proud of developing my fundamental editing skills on Hercules and Xena. More than proud, I am honored to have worked on Deadwood, for which I received a Primetime Emmy Award. Later, I realized that I was one of only a few Japanese to have received an Emmy, and the first to receive one in post-production sound. My family and friends seemed impressed that I was surviving as a woman working in this country and had received such a prestigious award.

 

What was your biggest challenge in your job (or on a particular project) and how did you overcome/solve it?

Balancing the demands of motherhood and work. Juggling work, household management with my husband (with his own demanding work schedule), and raising a child was overwhelming. As she grew and developed a full life, coordinating three schedules grew increasingly challenging. To avoid dropping the ball in work or family life requires a lot of planning. Often during my lunch, I became my daughter’s limo driver. I enjoyed it because we could talk and catch up. Of course, this applies to my husband, too.

 

What was the most fun you’ve had at work?

I was sound designing a show. It was supposed to be funny, but I wasn’t laughing. Then I edited and added the sound. I played it back and, the moment it hit me, I laughed so hard I fell off the chair, rolling on the floor in tears. All day when I played that spot, I laughed. The show got me.

 

Job wise, what do you hope to be doing five years from now?

As a rare Japanese sound editor here, I hope I will survive in this industry with few female sound editors in general and even fewer female SFX editors. I like to work with people who can bring the best out of me, but I’ve had some unpleasant experiences, especially when trying for a different or higher position. I experienced harassment and discrimination. I felt being a woman held me back and sometimes my English abilities were pointed out as a barrier.

In these very emotional situations, I learned to be strong. Bullies take away my sword and expect me to fight without a sword? I can still fight with a bamboo stick, moving forward with many small, light footsteps. I fight for those who follow who also refuse to succumb to injustice and abuse.

 

“I was sound designing a show. It was supposed to be funny, but I wasn’t laughing. Then I edited and added the sound. I played it back and, the moment it hit me, I laughed so hard I fell off the chair.”

 

What are your outside activities, hobbies, passions?

It’s all about my daughter and her activities. I’ve sort of forgotten my own hobbies and passions, but I like gardening, and I plan to travel many places after my daughter goes to college. When I was young, I was a good volleyball player and maybe I’d like to join a team. And maybe I will create music again.

 

Favorite movie(s)? Why?

Since childhood, fantasy movies were my favorite. My most favorite is Lord of the Rings. I am drawn to stories of loyalty and friendship. Movies often make you realize what is important. I love The Avengers! I love all superhero movies. I can relate to their struggles. With difficulty, heroes overcome bad people and encourage the innocent. That gives me power to do the same, not going to the dark side and not turning to greed. Every day is training day for when I can become what I’m supposed to be.

 

Favorite TV program(s)?  Why?

Monty Python’s Flying Circus and Fawlty Towers, because they are just so funny! Laughing is such a good and joyful feeling. I wish I could join Monty Python; maybe I should apply for a job at the Ministry of Silly Walks…

 

Do you have an industry mentor?

I worked with many supervisors; some taught me to see outside of the box when cutting SFX —nutrition for my creativity. I’ve met many talented sound designers that are simply nice people who share the way they do things. All of these are mentor moments.

 

What advice would you offer to someone interested in pursuing your line of work?

If I can do it, then you can do it. Work hard to show the best you’ve got. Talented people see what you are capable of and what you will become. Don’t be afraid to say, “I don’t know” — that’s how you learn. Be a reliable person, not just a talented sound editor. I’d rather work with a good person than with the best editor who is a jerk. Plus, you have fun working. One more thing: Sound editing is all subjective. Sometimes what you think is your best work is not accepted, so don’t get too attached. Don’t take criticism too personally. Be professional. You are cutting a sound for the client to hear.

 

Was there ever a circumstance when you had to rely on the Guild for help or assistance?

Once. I consulted the Guild about the relevant rules and regulations after working fewer than five days a week for several consecutive weeks.

 

Is there anything you’d like to say to your fellow Guild members, some words of encouragement?

We are in this together, so we understand what it’s like to work in this industry. When I feel stressed, I think I should express my feelings to trusted colleagues. Probably they have had a similar experience. Find a good trustworthy colleague who may have helpful advice or at least can ease your feelings and help you keep moving forward.

 

Compiled by Edward Landler      

Editor’s Note: To recommend a member (including yourself) to be featured on CineMontage.org, and the home page of the Editors Guild website, please contact edlandler@roadrunner.com.

Interested in Being Featured?

Tomm Carroll
Publications Director
323.876.4770, ext. 222
tcarroll@editorsguild.com